The pacific ocean is called the ring of fire because

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normal along all types of boundaries and occur all over the world. The Pacific Ocean is called the "Ring of Fire," because its borders outline a circle that is high in seismic activity. On the exterior of the Pacific Ocean, the border of the Pacific Continental Plate is increasing in the seabed and is affecting the North American Plate, the Nazca Plate, the Eurasian Plate, and other
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plates, causing the borders of the plates to collide, and bend, resulting in earthquakes (EnchantedLearning, 2004). Historical Earthquakes The state of California is no stranger to earthquakes and some of the historical earthquakes recorded has caused some major damage and has made many seismologists research how they can better predict an upcoming earthquake so people can be more prepared. On October 17, 1989, an earthquake of 6.9 magnitudes shook the San Francisco and Monterey Bay regions causing serve damage to many structures in the Bay area. Of course individuals remember the great earthquake from April 18, 1906 that destroyed much of San Francisco and measured ranging from 7.7 to 7.9 in magnitudes. The earthquake was felt from the state line of Oregon to south of Los Angeles. Southern California has recorded 10,000 earthquakes a year, but most are small and are never felt. Another historical earthquake was the one that shook off the coast of Japan measuring 8.9 to 9.0 magnitudes and caused a 30-foot tsunami. It was recorded that approximately 15,000 people died from this disaster (USGS, 2012). Potential Earthquakes Scientists have studied past earthquakes that have measured 7.0 or more for the past 200 years to help determine any future potential earthquakes. Another way scientists have estimated a future earthquake is by studying how rapidly the strain accrues in the plates. Scientists measure
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