Small grants have been available for weeds of

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2002. Small grants have been available for Weeds of National Significance and additional funding is delivered through the regional Cradle Coast Natural Resource Management Committee. Boneseed ( Chrysanthemoides monilifera ), bridal creeper ( Asparagus asparagoides ), asparagus fern ( Asparagus scandens ), ragwort ( Senecio jacobaea ), gorse ( Ulex europaeus ) and serrated tussock King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 75
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( Nassella trichotoma ) have been the focus of current weed programs. A voluntary community group the ‘Weedbusters’ is currently working to control weeds on the Island. In addition, DPIPWE and KINRMG have been working with landholders to map and control ragwort and gorse. Funding for landholder- based gorse control was secured for 2006–2009. KINRMG has mapped asparagus fern infestations and developed a control program that can be adopted if funding is secured, and in 2010 mapped sea spurge around the island and developed a sea spurge management plan with funding provided by Cradle Coast NRM. Prioritisation of threatened flora Tasmania is divided up into three natural resource management (NRM) regions, Cradle Coast, South and North. King Island falls within the Cradle Coast region, and NRM projects funded within the region can include King Island. As part of a 2006–2007 financial agreement between the Cradle Coast Authority and the Threatened Species Section (DPIPWE), a flora prioritisation project has been completed to deliver the following outcomes: A more general knowledge of priority flora species in targeted areas of the Cradle Coast region; Documentation of the location and proposed management actions for individual and groups of priority species; and Provision of a broad-scale planning tool for threatened flora species management within the region. About 200 vascular flora species listed on the TSP Act have been recorded in the Cradle Coast NRM region, including 43 from King Island. Results of the study are reported by Schahinger (2007), and relevant actions are included in the KIBMP. For current prioritisation of flora species refer to Table 2 of the KIBMP. Cat control The Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service have been carrying out cat trapping across the Island since approximately 1993. Control has been focused on the protection of threatened species and Lavinia State Reserve. In addition to this in 2005–2006 the KINRMG obtained funding from the World Wild Fund for Nature to run a short-term cat control program. The KINRMG continued with the program in a reduced form for another six months to secure samples for a dietary analysis of feral cats. This was completed in 2009. The project was aimed at the protection of threatened species. The KINRMG developed the King Island Cat Management Plan 2008–2013, outlining various objectives and actions. In 2010 an intensive feral cat trapping and domestic cat de-sexing program was conducted, funded by Cradle Coast NRM, and a report developed which reviewed past cat management work by the KINRMG and outlined future
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  • Fall '14
  • The Hours, ........., Threatened species, Bass Strait, Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, King Island

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