Practice the scene with students have back ups

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Practice the scene with students. Have back-ups available in case people cancel. Create a checklist that can be used the day of the crash. Make sure that all participants know their role. 9
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How to Conduct a Mock Crash The Day of the Mock Crash Scenario Begin setting up approximately two hours prior to the scheduled time. Scenario should not run over 30 minutes. Post-event assembly should last 30 to 45 minutes. Sample Schedule Night before event: Students distribute informational flyers to neighbors. 8 a.m. Vehicle placed on site. Have food available for cast. EMS/fire prepare vehicle for students (clear off glass and dangerous objects.) Establish radio contact with all rescue personnel. 8:30 a.m. Students and assistants arrive for make-up. Dress scene (scatter student belongings, vehicle debris, ground/pavement markings, and alcohol cans.) Confirm crew and students are comfortable with their roles. 9 a.m. Local police arrive and secure the scene’s perimeter. 9:30 a.m. Verify response units are standing by. Watch for arriving media. Place students in wrecked vehicle and cover vehicle with tarps. 9:45 a.m. Position crews. Brief media informally, distribute press kits as reporters arrive. Position volunteers around the perimeter to direct students when they arrive. 10
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How to Conduct a Mock Crash Sample Schedule, continued: 9:50 a.m. Students arrive. Confirm response units are ready for dispatch. 10 a.m. Drama Begins. Mock Crash Scene This is one possible scenario. The committee will want to create a scene that best suits the community. Play music to indicate the beginning. Play pre-recorded student conversations, car crash sound and 911 call with dispatch of vehicle over the PA system to set the scene. Car #1 — Contains four students Driver o Drinking or using drugs. o Wearing a seat belt. o Injured lightly, and dazed. Passenger in the front seat o Not wearing a seat belt. o Thrown through the windshield and is lying dead on hood of car. Two passengers in the back seat o Seriously injured and trapped in the vehicle. Car #2 — Contains two adults and two children Mom — front passenger side o Wearing a seat belt. Dad — driver o Slightly injured, but able to leave vehicle on his own. Child #1 o Thrown from the vehicle, lying on side of road with no pulse and no respiration. Child #2 o Child is injured, but not trapped. 11
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How to Conduct a Mock Crash Drama A passing vehicle pulls up and a person gets out to see if he/she can help. The student driver leaves car #1 dazed. An adult male leaves car #2 and approaches the child laying on the street. The bystander, now by the child, yells: “Does anyone know CPR?” One of the students in the audience answers: “Yes, I know CPR!” This student leaves the bleachers to assist during the demonstration.
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