The topic of incorporating personal responsibility

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The topic of incorporating personal responsibility with healthcare coverage is particularly interesting to me because as a nurse I am regularly in contact with patients who have morbidities that arise from multiple factors, including a lack of desire to be involved in taking responsibility for their health. Based on the research I have done on this subject, my present perspective is that although creating an atmosphere where people are willing to take personal responsibility for their health care is a good idea, the use of penalties for those who don’t may set a dangerous
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precedent. I instead support the incentive-based approach of using rewards to encourage healthy behaviors, along with personalized options for individuals with genetic or socioeconomic factors contributing to their health complications. However, I believe that this must be done in a way that can’t be turned into a penalty for those who are not willing or able to take advantage of the incentive. As a registered nurse, the overall idea that incentive-based care can improve health and result in savings for the employee, as well as cost savings for the employer, resonates with me. I believe this approach can create a positive cycle whereby the emphasis is not just on employer savings, but on personal responsibility contributing to the long term health of the individual and of the general population. Works Cited
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Alpınar, Zümrüt, Murat Civaner, and Yaman Őrs. “Rationing Healthcare: Should Life-Style Be Used As A Criterion?” The Anatolian Journal of Cardiology 10 (2010): 367-71. PubMed. Web. 16 Nov. 2011. Madison, Kristin, M., Kevin, G. Volpp, and Scott, D. Halpern. "The Law, Policy, and Ethics of Employers' Use of Financial Incentives to Improve Health." Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 39.3 (2011): 450-68. Web. 18 Nov. 2011. Patrick, Erine E. "Lose Weight or Lose Out: The Legality of State Medicaid Programs That Make Overweight Beneficiaries' Receipt of Funds Contingent Upon Healthy Lifestyle Choices." Emory Law Journal 58.1 (2008): 249-85. Academic Search Complete . Web. 18 Nov. 2011. Steinbrook, Robert. “Imposing Personal Responsibility for Health.” The New England Journal of Medicine 355.8 (2006): 753-56. PubMed. Web. 16 Nov. 2011. Yang, Y., Tony, and Len M. Nichols. "Obesity and Health System Reform: Private Vs. Public Responsibility." Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 39.3 (2011): 380-86. Web. 18 Nov. 2011.
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