2 Misjudgements by the panel in which case consideration will need to be given

2 misjudgements by the panel in which case

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2 Misjudgements by the panel, in which case consideration will need to be given to revisiting evaluations, especially if only a few jobs stick out like a sore thumb as being wrongly evaluated (this process is called ‘sore-thumbing’). 3 The possibility that some factors are more important than others and have not been given sufficient weight, in which case a decision may be made to provide for explicit weighting.
Chapter 68 Job Evaluation 707 Amend basic factor plan as necessary The initial test will almost certainly reveal the need to amend factor-level definitions and it may indicate that more radical changes to the factor plan are required, for example in the choice of factors or the number of levels. Following any amendments it is desirable to retest the basic plan. This is time- consuming, which is why a job evaluation exercise can be a lengthy process. But this is the time to get it right. Decide on weighting Weighting recognizes that there are differences in the importance of factors by allocating more or less points to them. The choice is between weighting and not weighting factors. If weighting is considered desirable, possibly on the basis of the initial test of the basic factor plan, there is a choice between explicit and implicit weighting. Explicit weighting means increasing the maximum points available for what were regarded as more important factors. Implicit weighting means allocating more levels, and there- fore points, to some factors than others. The most common but highly judgemental approach is for the project team to discuss and agree subjective views on which factors are more important and allocate additional points or extra levels accordingly. Another method of deciding on explicit weighting, ie extra points, is to get each member of the team to distribute 100 points amongst the factors, which are then revealed to the whole team, who reach an agreement on the most accept- able distribution. This discussion may be expected to take account of guiding principles such as that no factor will have a weighting of less than 5 per cent or more than 30 per cent. The weighted plan should be retested on the test jobs to ensure that it produces valid results. Produce full factor plan The basic factor plan (the range of factors and level definitions) produced after the initial test will be final- ized, taking into account decisions on weighting. Consider use of computer-aided evaluation Consideration at this stage can be given to the possibility of introducing computer-aided evaluation. The advantages and disadvantages of computer-aided evaluation are set out in Exhibit 68.8. EXHIBIT 68.8 Advantages and disadvantages of computer-aided job evaluation Advantages Disadvantages Greater consistency may be achieved – the same input information gives the same output result.

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