Chytrid fungus is a waterborne pathogen that causes

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Chytrid fungus is a waterborne pathogen that causes chytridiomycosis in amphibians. The disease has been implicated in the decline and extinction of frog species on mainland Australia (Tyler 1997). Declines in the range and abundance of Litoria raniformis have been limited to the establishment and spread of chytridiomycosis in Tasmania (Obendorf 2005). Chytrid fungus was recently identified on King Island (Annie Philips, DPIPWE pers. comm.). Insecticide use in agricultural areas, particularly aerial spraying and widely- used herbicides may also pose a threat to Litoria raniformis . Glyphosate-based herbicides are toxic to frogs, possibly because of the effect of the dispersant on tadpole gills (Bidwell & Gorrie 1995). Drought and climate change may be factors in the decline of Litoria raniformis . Reduced precipitation increases the likelihood of breeding habitat drying out and impeding recruitment for a population. Lack of recovery rains prevent re- emergence of adults aestivating underground and recolonisation of habitats by migrating frogs. King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 165
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Another potential threat to Litoria raniformis on King Island is the increasing number of Magpies and Forest Ravens on the island. Both these bird species may predate on daytime-active frogs such as Litoria raniformis that prefer open areas for basking and often move during the day through paddocks to and from farm dams (Donaghey 2003). Recovery Actions specific to King Island Provide information and extension support to the King Island Natural Resource Management committee, King Island council, Government agencies and the local community on the location, significance and management of known subpopulations and areas of potential habitat; Encourage landholders to fence around suitable habitat to exclude livestock and provide alternative watering troughs for livestock; Encourage landholders to consider protection of wetland habitat through voluntary agreements including covenants and management agreements; Encourage landholders in the responsible use of chemicals, especially around permanent freshwater waterbodies such as natural lagoons, wetlands and swamps, as well as artificial ponds and farm dams; Survey of potential habitat to determine the distribution of Litoria raniformis on King Island; Undertake survey work to determine the presence and extent of chytrid fungus; Develop a program to manage the threat of chytrid fungus; Identify priorities for frog management of King Island and implement conservation actions. King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 166
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Neophema chrysogaster (Orange-bellied Parrot) Description Neophema chrysogaster is a small parrot, about 21 cm long and weighing around 45 grams (Plate 13). The plumage is rich grass-green above, with a narrow dark-blue leading edge to the wing, green on the breast, and yellow underneath with a bright orange patch on the belly. The orange patch is brightest in males, paler in females and small and diffuse in juveniles. On the
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  • Fall '14
  • The Hours, ........., Threatened species, Bass Strait, Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, King Island

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