MSL101L07 Profession of Arms SR.pdf

I the profession and its ethic as the core of

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i The Profession and its Ethic as the core of institutional culture. Existing Army artifacts such as the Army Values, the Soldier’s Rules, oaths of office, and other military imperatives all work together in the ethic as part of the institutional culture. i The relationship between the Profession and its ethic and leadership. The Army must be self-regulating, and that falls on the shoulders of leaders at all levels. If the Army fails to self-regulate its ethic, it is quite justifiable that those external to the Profession must do so on its behalf, which degrades the autonomy and the legitimacy of the Profession. ADHERING TO THE ARMY ETHIC THE ARMY PROFESSION 24
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“Discipline is based on pride in the Profession of Arms, on meticulous attention to details, and on mutual respect and confidence. Discipline must be a habit so engrained that it is stronger than the excitement of battle or the fear of death.” General George S. Patton, Jr. Former Commanding General Third Army and 7th Armies 25 THE ARMY PROFESSION
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26 CIVIL-MILITARY RELATIONS There is a triangular set of relationships between three groups that has the greatest influence on the outcome of wars among nation-states. For most nations, those three groups are: 1. The people who establish the government and live under its authority. 2. The state or the government. 3. The armed force the government raises from among the people to defend the Nation. This triangular set of relationships is known within political science as the “civil-military relations” of a nation. T h e C o n st i t u t i o n a n d E l e c t e d R e p r e s e n t a t i v e s T h e P e o p l e of o u r N a t i o n T h e A r m e d F o r c e s o f o u r N a t i o n
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27 THE ARMY PROFESSION THREE FOUNDATIONS OF CIVIL-MILITARY RELATIONS The U.S. Army began in a unique way in the world among nations: its Soldiers took an oath of service sworn to the defense of a founding Constitution rather than defense of the sovereign or a territory. The historical origins and the moral underpinnings of our military profession lead the Army service member to affirm by oath and reflect by actions the following realities among others: The first foundation: the role and the purpose of the U.S. Army The United States is a unique and independent sovereign power that exists under social contract with the American people. The existence of the Nation and the Army in particular is for the purpose of providing for the common defense and to contribute to the general welfare of its citizens. We support the Republic. The Army Profession exists not for itself but for the noble and honorable purpose of preserving peace, supporting and defending the Constitution, and protecting the American people and way of life. The second foundation: the subordination of the Army to Civilian authority Civilian leaders, duly elected by the people, Congress and the Executive branch, have ultimate authority over the Army. Every volunteer in military service becomes a servant of the Nation to do its “Our support for our Constitutional way of government, for civilian
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