asbestos-related_disease_indicators.doc

Source aihw australian cancer incidence and mortality

Info icon This preview shows pages 16–18. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Source: AIHW Australian Cancer Incidence and Mortality Books (compiled by AIHW from data supplied by state and territory cancer registries). Data sources All c ases of cancer in Australia (except basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas of the skin) are notifiable by legislation to state and territory cancer registries. These registries report to the National Cancer Statistics Clearing House (NCSCH) which is operated by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) in collaboration with the Australasian Association of Cancer Registries (AACR). The cause of every Australian death is certified by a medical practitioner and recorded on a death certificate. These death certificates are required by state and territory Registrars of Births, Deaths and Marriages under jurisdiction specific legislation. On behalf of the Registrars these data are assembled, coded to the underlying cause of death, and released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (A BS). The data are releas ed to the AIHW who publish t he da ta on its website. > The NSW Dust Diseases Board records the number of compensation claims for mesothelioma in NSW. Although representing only one state, NSW accounts for around one-third of the Australian population and as such may be considered as an important resource for estimating the incidence of asbestosis in Australia. > NDS are data based on information received annually from Australian workers’ compensation authorities. Further information Mesothelioma in Australia: Incidence 1982 to 2006 and Deaths 1997 to 2007, Safe Work Australia, 2010. Greillier L and Astoul P. Mesothelioma and Asbestos-Related Pleural Diseases. Respiration 2008;76:-15. Leigh J & Driscoll T. Malignant Mesothelioma in Australia, 1945-2002. International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health 2003;9:206-217. Nationa l Healt h an d Medica l Researc h Counci l 2010 . Asbesto s relate d diseases. Accessed 12 February 2010, <ww w .nhmrc.go v.au/your_health/issues/asbestos.htm>. Asbestos-related Disease Indicators, August 2010 ... 6
Image of page 16

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
3 Asbestosis The condition Asbestosis is a chronic lung disease caused by the inhalation of large numbers of asbestos fibres over an extended period. Symptoms of the disease typically appear about 10 years after initial exp osure to asbestos fibres: a much shorter latency period than that for mesothelioma. However, unlike the rapid development of mesothelioma after onset, asbestosis is a disease that progresses slowly. Asbestosis is characterised by the formation of scar tissue (fibrosis) around inflammation caused by asbestos fibres that have lodged deep within the lung. As the disease progresses, the scarred lung tissue hardens, making it increasingly difficult for the lungs to expand and contract: consequently making it more difficult to breathe. This leads to shortness of breath on exertion, or a dry cough or chest pain. As the disease progresses this becomes more extreme, even when not exercising ( W orkers Health Centre 2010).
Image of page 17
Image of page 18
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern