Further review into aircraft logs show pilot squawks

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Further review into aircraft logs show pilot squawks about the right engine. About 10 days before the accident, the crash pilot squawked a possible power loss and noted a minor fuel leak below the right engine during preflight inspection. The problem was noted to be not replicable by another pilot during a ground test. On the morning of the flight the pilot called Zonk air to report that the right engine was dripping fuel again. The owner/operator replied that it could be vent or fuel cap leaking fuel top the older aircraft. After reviewing N517RL’s maintenance logs, it is evident that there was a list of deferred maintenance items and incomplete maintenance entries. Something of note is an incomplete entry that work began on the right engine to correct the reported squawks and readjusting the turbo waste gates. Differed maintenance items included adjustment of pilot seat springs and locking the travel adjustment slide of the pilot’s seat, inspecting and replacing first aid kits, adding cargo nets and straps to the aircraft flight kit, tightening friction controls on the cockpit power quadrant and repairing loose cooling baffling on the right engine.
1.6 Pilot Information According to the FAA’s Airman Registry, the pilot was found to be an instrument rated commercial multi engine pilot. The pilot was considered a new hire with about one year working with the company. The pilot’s training records from previous flight schools were used as the pilot’s logbook could not be located. The records indicate that he had flown 300 hours total. 50 hours were multi engine time. With 15 hours in the make and model of accident aircraft. The pilot only had five hours actual of flying in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC). In addition the pilot was noted to be two days over the grace period for a part 135 check ride, but it is uncertain s the part 135 check ride record were not found for this pilot. It was indicated after interviews with various employees that the pilot was found asleep in the crew lounges before flights on multiple occasions. The pilot had made it known to co- workers that he was breaking up with his girlfriend and didn’t want to go home. The pilot was filling in for the original pilot of the flight after they called in sick. Knowing this the owner/operator allowed the pilot to work, because the pilot had wanted to. In addition the owner/operator stated that the pilot seemed tired all the time. 1.7 Company Information The company Zonk Air was found to be certified for part 91 and 135 flights. By locating the issued part 135 certificate it was determined that the company was based in Oxnard California. The Zonk Air fleet was three aircraft, one Piper Navajo (PA-31) and two Cessna 310s. The primary operations were local scenic flights.

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