Point 2 the mennonite culture which is being

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Point 2: The Mennonite culture which is being forcefully pressured onto Nomi is detrimental to her development as a young adult. The more The Mouth exerts the Mennonite beliefs onto Nomi, the more she defies them. Nomi’s behaviour beings to progressively worsen: “ I always without fail get a big red circle around the F for Flippant Attitude. But I don’t really give a fuck” (Toews 182), says Nomi, when referring to her report card. Point 3: She also turns to drugs and her favorite brand of cigarettes, “sweet caps”, to cope with the profuse amount of stress she is under: “ My sister’s leftover Valium from her wisdom teeth being removed were still in the cupboard above the stove. I took two and my Sweet Caps” (Toews 117). It is Nomi’s defiance and denial of her Mennonite culture that catapults her into a downward spiral consisting of a life fueled by drugs, alcohol, and oppositional behaviour. Body paragraph 2 Introductory point: The novel is written in anecdotal form, chronicling Nomi’s past experiences and memories as a child and teen throughout the early 2000’s.
Point 1: Being a white, English speaking Canadian, Nomi, by birth, embodies the traits of an individual with the utmost opportunity for success. However, although Nomi lives in Canada, a place renowned for its fundamental freedoms and privileges, this is all negated by the fact that her uncle runs East Village like a communist nation: “Tash called up The Mouth and told him she’d found one of Trudie’s Kris Kristofferson eight-tracks and she was very afraid she was about to listen to it and The Mouth said okay, now, calm down, pray with me. Take the…item and put it in a paper bag. Staple the bag closed and bring it to me here, at the parsonage, and we will deal with it together” (Toews 24). This quote profiles the extent of which The Mouth will go to in order to gain control over the village, in this case regarding what Nomi’s sister, Tash, listens to. Point 2: Nomi has a yearning to escape East VIllage and unearth her true potential, but it is the time and place that she is living in which holds her back: “ Mennos are discouraged from going to the city, forty miles down the road, but are encouraged to travel to the remotest corners of Third World countries (Toews 16). Nomi then goes on to say: “ I dream of escaping into the real world” (Toews 16), which is evidence of her craving to escape East Village and see, “the real East VIllage in New York City”. Point 3: East Village is not appealing to Nomi, as she is being held back, so much that she accepts her fate of working in the chicken evisceration for the rest of her life: “ I’m already anticipating failure. That much I’ve learned to do. But then what the hell will it matter to me while I’m snapping tiny necks and chucking feathery corpses onto a conveyor belt in a dimly lit cinder- block slaughterhouse on the edge of a town not of this world” (Toews 10).
Body paragraph 3 Introductory point: A Complicated Kindness

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