Created by Expeditionary Learning on behalf of Public Consulting Group Inc

Created by expeditionary learning on behalf of public

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Created by Expeditionary Learning, on behalf of Public Consulting Group, Inc. © Public Consulting Group, Inc., with a perpetual license granted to Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound, Inc. NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G7:M2A:U2:L2 June 2014 7
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GRADE 7: MODULE 2A: UNIT 2: LESSON 2 Reading Closely: Introducing Chávez’s Commonwealth Club Address and Considering the Plight of the Farmworker Work Time (continued) Meeting Students’ Needs Point out that readers generally can’t say for sure what the central claim of a text is until they’ve read the whole thing, because it doesn’t always appear in the same place in texts. To help them see the structure of the Chávez speech, you are telling them the central claim, which you determined in the same way they will determine the main claims in various sections of the speech. Point out that the students just heard that sentence in the speech when they were listening to the recording. Direct students to Paragraph 15 of the text and ask a student to read aloud Lines 109 and 110. Point out that the speech has about 30 paragraphs, so this is halfway through the text. Ask if this is where they would expect a central claim to be. Ask if this is where they put their central claim when they wrote their Lyddie essay argument essay. Why would Chávez put his central claim here, in the middle of the speech? Why not at the beginning or the end? Listen for students to say he didn’t put it at the beginning because he wanted to build up to it; putting it in the middle gives him the chance to prove it in the rest of the speech. Point out that this is a very common structure for speeches: Unlike in a school essay, the central claim is rarely at the beginning. Instead, speakers build to their central claim, state it, and then prove it. Now ask students to find the part of the anchor chart that shows the main claim of Paragraphs 1–7 and put their fingers on it. When most students have their fingers in the right place, call on one student to read it aloud. Explain that identifying a main claim, or the main topic of a section, is more than gist notes and less than a full summary. Display two poor examples: “Working conditions” and “Statistics show that living conditions for farmworkers are very hard.” Ask students: Why is ‘Working conditions’ not a good way to describe the main claim of this section? Listen for something like: “It gives only a word or two to tell the topic and doesn’t explain what Chávez said about this topic.” Ask students: “Why is ‘Statistics show that living conditions for farmworkers are very hard’ not a good way to describe the main claim of this section? Listen for students to point out that this describes only the content of Paragraph 3, not the whole section.
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