Threats to the enterprises network security can come

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Threats to the enterprise's network security can come not only from external hackers who gain access to the system illegally but from the business's own employees as well. The enterprise must protect its data and processes from both sources of threat. Another way in which computer systems and networks can be vulnerable is through computer viruses and worms. These are malicious programs or pieces of code that are loaded onto a com- puter without the user's knowledge and against the user's wishes that alter the way that the computer operates or that modifies the data or programs that are stored on the computer. Simple viruses can be self-replicating and use up a computer's memory or oth- erwise slow down or disable a computer; more complex viruses can transmit themselves across networks and bypass security systems to infect other computers or systems, corrupting or eras- ing programs or data. Computer viruses can be loaded onto the computer intentionally by internal or external hackers, but also through the receipt of infected email attachments. There are a number of types of computer crimes to which an enterprise may become susceptible if sufficient security mea - sures are not in place. One category of computer crime involves the unauthorized entry of criminal hackers into the enterprise's computer system. Piggybacking is one type of crime in this cat- egory. In piggybacking, the criminal uses the codes or passwords of an authorized user to gain illegal access to the system. Piggy- backing is also used to refer to the unauthorized use of a terminal in the system. Another type of computer crime involving ille- gal access is entry through a trapdoor. These are unknown entry points into a program or network that allow criminals to gain access to and control the system. A second category of computer crime involves intentional damage to the system's data. Data diddling involves the chang- ing of data and information before they enter the system. As opposed to honest mistakes or keyboarding errors, data diddling is intentionally done with the purpose of damaging the ability of the enterprise to do business. Similarly, data leakage is the intentional erasure or removal of files or even entire databases from a system without leaving any trace that they have been removed or even that they existed. Data leakage can result in cost to the enterprise in the recovery or replacement of the lost data as well as from loss of customers’ confidence due to errors resulting from the data loss. Customers can also be harmed from data leakage if the leakage results in receipts or credits not being posted correctly or at all. Another way in which the enterprise's communications networks can be harmed is through zapping, the process of damaging or erasing data and information. Scaveng- ing is another type of crime in this category. It involves searching through the physical trash can in the computer center or the elec- tronic trash can in the computer to find discarded data or other information about the system's programs or processes. Zapping
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  • Spring '12
  • Kushal Kanwar
  • Computer Security, Computer network, EBSCO Information Services, EBSCO Research Starters®

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