Cicero saw his that mans doctor on this street not his own A good illustration

Cicero saw his that mans doctor on this street not

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Cicero saw his (that man’s) doctor on this street, not his own. (A good illustration of the distinction between eius, gen. of the pers. pron., and suum, the reflex. possessive.) 8. Nemo filiam acerbam consulis ipsius diu diligere potuit. No man was able to love for long the shrewish daughter of the consul himself. 9. Hi Ciceronem ipsum secum iunxerunt, nam eum semper dilexerant. These men joined Cicero himself [with themselves], for they had always esteemed him. (Again, idiomatic Eng. would likely omit “with themselves.”) 10. Femina ante illam horam litteras suas miserat. The woman had sent her letter before that hour. (“Own” can and often should be omitted in translating suus, -a, -um, unless needed for emphasis or to avoid ambiguity.)
2 TEACHER’S GUIDE and ANSWER KEY for WHEELOCKS LATIN : Chapter 13 11. Ille bonam senectutem habuit, nam bene vixerat. That man had a good old age, for he had lived well. (A good illustration of the distinction between the perf. and pluperf. tenses.) 12. Mater filium bene intellexit, et adulescens ei pro patientia gratias egit. The mother understood her son well, and the young man gave thanks to her (thanked her) for her patience. 13. However, those young men came to Caesar himself yesterday. Ill ß adul ë scent ë s, autem, ad Caesarem ipsum her ß v ë n ë runt. 14. Cicero, therefore, will never join his (Caesar’s) name with his own. Cicer « , igitur, n « men eius cum su « numquam iunget. (“Caesar’s” is merely Wheelock’s clarification that “his” refers to someone other than Cicero himself and so need not be translated.) 15. Cicero always esteemed himself and even you esteem yourself. Cicer « s ë semper d ß l ë xit et etiam t t ë d ß ligis. 16. Cicero used to praise his own books and I now praise my own books. Cicer « libr « s su « s laud ~ bat et (ego) libr « s me « s nunc laud « . ( Ego can be used in the second clause in order to emphasize the contrast between Cicero and the speaker.) 17. The consul Cicero himself had never seen his (Caesar’s) book. C « nsul Cicer « ipse librum eius numquam v ß derat. (For “Caesar’s,” see n. on 14 above.) SENTENTIAE ANTIQUAE 1. Ipse ad eos contendebat equitesque ante se misit. He was himself hurrying to them and sent the cavalry ahead of him. (“Him” is a better translation for se than “himself” here, because the reflex. reference is clear from the context and “himself” would be awkward Eng.: ALWAYS have your students strive for natural, idiomatic Eng. translations.) 2. Ipsi nihil per se sine eo facere potuerunt. Those very men could accomplish nothing by themselves (on their own) without him. 3. Ipse signum suum et litteras suas a principio recognovit. From the outset he himself recognized his own seal and his own letter. (The repetition suum/suas is emphatic here; otherwise suas could have been used to refer to both signum and litteras. ) 4. Quisque ipse se diligit, quod quisque per se sibi carus est.

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