Mr PINCKNEY South Carolina can never receive the plan if it prohibits the slave

Mr pinckney south carolina can never receive the plan

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Mr. PINCKNEY . South Carolina can never receive the plan if it prohibits the slave-trade. In every proposed extension of the powers of Congress, that State has expressly and watchfully excepted that of meddling with the importation of negroes. TeachingAmericanHistory.org. Used with permission. . 1 6
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NEW YORK STATE SOCIAL STUDIES RESOURCE TOOLKIT Supporting Question 3 Featured Source Source C: Benjamin Franklin, speech promoting the strengths of the Constitution (excerpts), September 17, 1787 I confess that there are several parts of this constitution which I do not at present approve, but I am not sure I shall never approve them. For having lived long, I have experienced many instances of being obliged by better information, or fuller consideration, to change opinions even on important subjects, which I once thought right, but found to be otherwise. It is therefore that the older I grow, the more apt I am to doubt my own judgment, and to pay more respect to the judgment of others. Most men, indeed, as well as most sects in religion, think themselves in possession of all truth, and that wherever others differ from them, it is so far error.… In these sentiments, Sir, I agree to this Constitution, with all its faults,…I doubt, too, whether any other Convention we can obtain may be able to make a better Constitution. For, when you assemble a number of men to have the advantage of their joint wisdom you inevitably assemble with those men all their prejudices, their passions, their errors of opinion, their local interests, and their selfish views. From such an assembly can a perfect production be expected? It therefore astonishes me, sir, to find this system approaching so near to perfection as it does;...Thus I consent, Sir, to this Constitution, because I expect no better, and because I am not sure, that it is not the best. The opinions I have had of its errors, I sacrifice to the public good.…Much of the strength and efficiency of any government, in procuring and securing happiness to the people, depends, on opinion, — on the general opinion of the goodness of the government, as well as of the wisdom and integrity of its governors. I hope, therefore, that for our own sakes, as a part of the people, and for the sake of posterity, we shall act heartily and unanimously in recommending this Constitution (if approved by Congress and confirmed by the Conventions) wherever our influence may extend, and turn our future thoughts and endeavors to the means of having it well administered. TeachingAmericanHistory.org. Used with permission. . 1 7
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NEW YORK STATE SOCIAL STUDIES RESOURCE TOOLKIT Supporting Question 4 Featured Source Source A: Constitutional Convention, sections discussing issues of representation, Article I, Section 2; Article II, Sections 1–2; Article IV, Section 4; Article V; Article VII, United States Constitution, 1787 Article I Section 2 The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second Year by the People of the several States.…
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