Finally if you have trouble keeping straight the terms elastic and inelastic

Finally if you have trouble keeping straight the

  • Notes
  • sendemailtoknow
  • 30
  • 67% (3) 2 out of 3 people found this document helpful

This preview shows page 9 - 12 out of 30 pages.

Finally, if you have trouble keeping straight the terms  elastic  and  inelastic,  here's a memory trick for you:  nelastic curves, such as in panel (a) of  Figure 1 , look like the letter I. This is not a deep insight, but it might  help on your next exam. 5-1e Total Revenue And The Price Elasticity Of Demand When studying changes in supply or demand in a market, one variable we often want to  study is  total revenue   ,  the amount paid by buyers and received by sellers of the good. In  any market, total revenue is  P ×   Q  , the price of the good times the quantity of the good sold.  We can show total revenue graphically, as in  Figure 2 . The height of the box under the  demand curve is  P,  and the width is  Q . The area of this box, P ×   Q,  equals the total revenue in  this market. In  Figure 2 , where  P = $4and  Q = 100, total revenue is $4  ×  100, or $400. How does total revenue change as one moves along the demand curve? The answer depends  on the price elasticity of demand. If demand is inelastic, as in panel (a) of Figure 3 , then an  increase in the price causes an increase in total revenue. Here an increase in price from $4 to  $5 causes the quantity demanded to fall from 100 to 90, so total revenue rises from $400 to  $450. An increase in price raises  P ×   Q  because the fall in  Q  is proportionately smaller than  the rise in  P . In other words, the extra revenue from selling units at a higher price  (represented by area A in the figure) more than offsets the decline in revenue from selling  fewer units (represented by area B).
Image of page 9
Image of page 10
We obtain the opposite result if demand is elastic: An increase in the price causes a decrease in total revenue.  In panel (b) of  Figure 3 , for instance, when the price rises from $4 to $5, the quantity demanded falls from 100  to 70, so total revenue falls from $400 to $350. Because demand is elastic, the reduction in the quantity  demanded is so great that it more than offsets the increase in the price. That is, an increase in price reduces  P ×   Q  because the fall in  Q  is proportionately greater than the rise in  P. In this case, the extra revenue from selling  units at a higher price (area A) is smaller than the decline in revenue from selling fewer units (area B). The examples in this figure illustrate some general rules: When demand is inelastic (a price elasticity less than 1), price and total revenue move in the same  direction.
Image of page 11
Image of page 12

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 30 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes