I asked Bandai if I could direct something else and they said Do whatever you

I asked bandai if i could direct something else and

This preview shows page 129 - 131 out of 238 pages.

I asked Bandai if I could direct something else, and they said ‘Do whatever you want.’” 1 With Bandai’s blessing, Oshii directed Talk- ing Head (1992), his personal meditation on the art and industry of film and animation. Although the film sometimes is billed as a mix of live action and anime, the animation does not occupy very much screen time (and only a very small bit of animation at the begin- ning is in what has come to be accepted as the anime style). Like Oshii’s other live action films before Avalon ( The Red Spectacles and Stray Dog: Kerberos Panzer Cops, which are discussed briefly in chapter 7), the style of Talking Head is very different from that of his animated films. Talking Head takes on an obvious staged
Image of page 129
form, drawing from both Japanese and Western styles, with most of the action taking place as if in a play. In true Oshii fashion, the end reveals that most of the film’s events had been dreamed by the main character. Bandai also was responsible for Oshii’s involvement in Ghost in the Shell, the film for which the director became best known around the world.After completing work on Patlabor 2, Oshii con- sulted with Bandai Visual about what direction to take with his next project. Originally he was planning to direct an OVA series based on his manga Kenroh Densetsu (released by Dark Horse Comics in English as Hellhounds: Panzer Cops ), set in the same universe as his previous live-action films The Red Spectacles (1987) and Stray Dog: Kerberos Panzer Cops (1991). Instead, Bandai sug- gested that Oshii next work on their proposed adaptation of the manga Ghost in the Shell. His work on the two Patlabor films situ- ated him perfectly to work on this film, as the plot coincided with many of the themes he had been pursuing. Although he had not created the story on which the film was based, Oshii managed to make the work his own; original manga author Masamune Shirow gave him permission to reformulate the plot as he saw fit. Oshii said that he was given the license to direct the film “in my own style, with my own ideas . . . . I had the freedom to put Ghost into my world, without having to further ask his [Shirow’s] approval.” 2 With its mix of concerns about technology and the nature of real- ity, the Ghost in the Shell manga was perfect for adaptation by Oshii. Although largely excised from the film version, the original manga contained a good deal of political critique, and dialogue like “Emphasizing a lifestyle based on consumption is the ultimate violence against poor countries” 3 made the source material a good thematic fit with Oshii’s previous work in Patlabor 2. As a manga artist, Ghost in the Shell creator Shirow is unique in both style and production. Many manga titles are drawn quickly to meet tight deadlines. In contrast, Shirow’s manga is very de- tailed, with complex lines and an equally complex plot. Unlike other manga artists, many of whom employ a stable of staffers to meet publication demands, Shirow draws all of his art himself. In fact, he is something of an enigma; no publicity pictures of the artist exist, and his name is a pseudonym. He made his debut in 120 * STRAY DOG OF ANIME
Image of page 130
Image of page 131

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 238 pages?

  • Spring '18
  • jessica strollo
  • Mamoru Oshii

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture