Tecumsehs Indian Confederacy a confederation of Native Americans in the Great

Tecumsehs indian confederacy a confederation of

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Tecumseh’s Indian Confederacy: a confederation of Native Americans in the Great Lakes region of the United States that began to form in the early 19th century around the teaching of Tenskwatawa (The Prophet).[1] The confederation grew over several years and came to include several thousand warriors. Shawnee leader Tecumseh, the brother of The Prophet, developed into the leader of the group as early as 1808. Commodore Perry: a Commodore of the United States Navy who commanded ships in several wars, including the War of 1812 and the Mexican– American War. He played a leading role in the opening of Japan to the West with the Convention of Kanagawa in 1854. Andrew Jackson: an American soldier and statesman who served as the seventh president of the United States from 1829 to 1837. Before being elected to the presidency, Jackson gained fame as a general in the United States Army and served in both houses of Congress. Battle of Horseshoe Bend: On March 27, 1814, the forces of Andrew Jackson defeat the Creeks in the Battle of Horseshoe Bend, on the Tallapoosa River in Alabama. This decisive victory ends the Creek War. Commodore Thomas MacDonough: U.S. naval officer who won one of the most important victories in the War of 1812 at the Battle of Plattsburg (or Lake Champlain) against the British. Fort McHenry: a historical American coastal pentagonal bastion fort located in the Locust Point neighborhood of Baltimore, Maryland. It is best known for its role in the War of 1812, when it successfully defended Baltimore Harbor from an attack by the British navy from the Chesapeake Bay on September 13–14, 1814. Francis Scott Key: an American lawyer, author, and amateur poet from Frederick, Maryland who is best known for writing a poem which later became the lyrics for the United States' national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner". Treaty of Ghent: he peace treaty that ended the War of 1812 between the United States of America and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. Both sides signed it on December 24, 1814, in the city of Ghent, United Netherlands (now Belgium). Battle of New Orleans: fought on January 8, 1815 between British troops led by General Edward Pakenham and American forces led by General Andrew Jackson. Despite being outnumbered 2:1, the Americans, who had constructed sophisticated earthworks, won a decisive victory against the British assault. Hartford Convention: The Hartford Convention was a series of meetings from December 15, 1814 to January 5, 1815, in Hartford, Connecticut, United States, in which the New England Federalist Party met to discuss their grievances concerning the ongoing War of 1812 and the political problems arising from the federal government
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