sequencesDrJeffreyscreatedtheabilitytoperformhumanidentityte...

This preview shows page 32 - 33 out of 64 pages.

sequences, Dr. Jeffreys created the ability to perform human identity tests. These DNA repeat regions became known as VNTRs, which stands for variable number of tandem repeats. The technique used by Dr. Jeffreys to examine the VNTRs was called restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) because it involved the use of a restriction enzyme to cut the regions of DNA surrounding the VNTRs. This RFLP method was first used to help in an English immigration case and shortly thereafter to solve a double homicide case. Since that time, human identity testing using DNA typing methods has been widespread. The past 15 years have seen tremendous growth in the use of DNA evidence in crime scene investigations. Today, more than 150 public forensic laboratories and several dozen private paternity testing laboratories conduct hundreds of thousands of DNA tests annually in the United States. In addition, most countries in Europe and Asia have forensic DNA programs. The number of laboratories around the world conducting DNA testing will continue to grow as the technique gains in popularity within law enforcement. Let’s go back to the early 1980s and review a murder case in England that was the first to use DNA technology in criminal investigation. Since the Narborough murders (discussed later in this chapter), the DNA technique has often been used successfully in the United States, beginning in 1987 in the  Florida  v.  Andrews  case, involving a sexual assault. Although it has been used successfully in many criminal trials, future issues will probably focus on the admissibility of DNA test results. Analyzing DNA Genetic patterns found in blood or semen can be just as distinctive as fingerprints. Traditional serology tests on bodily fluids often do not discriminate enough to either exclude or include a suspect in a crime. DNA analysis provides much more conclusive analysis. The unique genetic patterns found in each person’s DNA make it possible, with a high degree of accuracy, to associate a suspect with (or exclude a suspect from) a crime. Except in the case of identical twins, every person’s DNA and resulting DNA pattern are different. The process of analyzing, or “typing,” DNA begins with DNA source material such as blood or semen. After the DNA is removed from the sample chemically, restriction enzymes known as endonucleases are added that cut the DNA into particles or fragments. The particles are then mixed with a sieving gel and sorted out according to size by a process called electrophoresis. In this process, the DNA moves along the gel-coated plate,

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture