Renaissance Dante Alighieri search for an ideal vernacular Ramon Llull Ars

Renaissance dante alighieri search for an ideal

This preview shows page 35 - 43 out of 61 pages.

Renaissance Dante Alighieri – search for an ideal vernacular Ramon Llull – Ars Magna – devising a perfect language that would persuade infidels of the truth of Christianity Musical languages from the Renaissance were tied up with mysticism, magic and alchemy, sometimes also referred to as the language of the birds (Solresol is one such). Bacon, Descartes and Leibniz, all proposed international languages
Image of page 35
Auxiliary Languages: Esperanto 1887: Introduced by Dr. L.L. Zamenhof No concentrated area where it’s spoken, but speakers are everywhere— between 100,000 and 2,000,000 Does not replace other languages—acts as a second common language between people. Universal language Can supposedly be learned in much less time than other languages. Is politically unbiased. He did not really make an artificial language, but a sort of synthesis of our principal modern languages. He chose for the vocabulary of his language the most international roots, all very Latin and Germanic Telefono, telegrafo, teatre, arto, muziko, onklo, sukcesi, marklo Link: many on you tube
Image of page 36
Principles To render the study of the language so easy as to make its acquisition mere play to the learner. To enable the learner to make direct use of his knowledge with persons of any nationality, whether the language be universally accepted or not; in other words, the language is to be directly a means of international communication. To find some means of overcoming the natural indifference of mankind, and disposing them, in the quickest manner possible, and en masse, to learn and use the proposed language as a living one, and not only in last extremities, and with the key at hand.
Image of page 37
Esperanto Phonetics A, “father” B C, “bits” Ĉ, “church” D E, “get” F G, “go” Ĝ, “jet” H, “loch” Ĥ I, “machine” J, “yes” Ĵ, “measure” K L M N O, “go” P R, “burrito" S, “said” Ŝ, “shed” T U, “boot” Ŭ, “water” V Z
Image of page 38
Esperanto Grammar Every letter has only one sound and is always pronounced. Accent is always on the next-to-last syllable (penultimate). Vowels are never diphthongized. Parts of speech are formed by adding endings to words: “o” = noun… instruisto (teacher) “a” = adjective… nova (new) “j” = plural… Inteligentaj personoj (intelligent people) “n” = direct object… Esperanto havas facilaj n regulojn (Esperanto has easy rules) Past tense = -is No irregularities
Image of page 39
Esperanto Grammar No inflectional endings for cases Infinitive Present Past Future Imperative Conditional To see Sees Saw Will see See! Would see -i -as -is -os -u -us Vidi Vidas Vidis Vidos Vidu vidus
Image of page 40
Noun Subject Object Singular -o -on Plural -oj -ojn Adjective Subject Object Singular -a -an Plural -aj -ajn
Image of page 41
How successful?
Image of page 42
Image of page 43

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 61 pages?

  • Spring '16
  • Ravi Banavar
  • Constructed language

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture