Boss Tweed was an American politician most famous for his leadership of Tammany

Boss tweed was an american politician most famous for

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Boss Tweed was an American politician most famous for his leadership of Tammany Hall , the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in the politics of 19th century New York . At the height of his influence, Tweed was the third-largest landowner in New York City , a director of the Erie Railway , the Tenth National Bank , and the New-York Printing Company, as well as proprietor of the Metropolitan Hotel . Tweed was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1852, and the New York City Board of Advisors in 1856. In 1858, Tweed became the "Grand Sachem" of Tammany Hall. He was elected to the New York State Senate in 1867. Ellis Island: Despite its small size, Ellis Island--a tiny strip of land located in Upper New York Bay, near the New Jersey shore--holds a big part of the history of the United States. Of the 16 million immigrants who arrived in the U.S. from 1892 to 1954, 12 million of them passed through the federal immigration station located on the island. Social Darwinism - Herbert Spencer, a 19th century philosopher, promoted the idea of Social Darwinism. Social Darwinism is an application of the theory of natural selection to social, political, and economic issues. In its simplest form, Social Darwinism follows the mantra of "the strong survive," including human issues. This theory was used to promote the idea that the white European race was superior to others, and therefore, destined to rule over them. Promotory Point, Utah – a Promontory in Box Elder County , Utah , United States , is notable as the location of Promontory Summit where the United States ' first Transcontinental Railroad was officially completed on May 10, 1869. In May 1869, the railheads of the Union Pacific and Central Pacific railroads finally met at Promontory Summit, Utah Territory . The Panic of 1893 was a national economic crisis set off by the collapse of two of the country's largest employers, the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad and the National Cordage Company. Following of the failure of these two companies, a panic erupted on the stock market. Hundreds of businesses had overextended themselves, borrowing money to expand their operations. When the financial crisis struck, banks and other investment firms began calling in loans, causing hundreds of business bankruptcies across the United States. Banks, railroads, and steel mills especially fell into bankruptcy. Over fifteen thousand businesses closed during the Panic of 1893. The Sherman Anti-Trust Act : Congress passed this act in 1890, and this is the source of all American anti monopoly laws. The law forbids every contract, scheme, deal, conspiracy to restrain trade. It also forbids conspirations to secure monopoly of a given industry. The ideas were new and had to wait before they could achieve some efficiency. Theodore Roosevelt committed himself in 1901 and during both of his mandates to a strong war against monopolies, launching the federal government in 1906 in a lawsuit against the Standard because of discriminatory practices on the market, abuse of power and excessive control on the American oil industry.
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