Dissension from any one of these social constructs often results in social

Dissension from any one of these social constructs

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a salon), or paying women thirty-three cents less per dollar than a man. Dissension from any one of these social constructs often results in social ostracization, such as being called a “dike” or being excluded from social spheres. Morocco’s structure is based heavily on Islamic religion, where Allah reigns supreme. Finding a Christian, Jewish, or other place of worship is extremely rare, and when one is present it is often the center of controversy and violence. While Christianity is the majority in America, it is not unheard of to see a synagogue or mosque. Both regions are very patriarchal, placing men as the head of the household and the main decision maker. Women are often objects of sin and
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Cameron 9 lust, the “weaker vessel” blamed for the fall of man (in both religions, Eve gave into temptation and ate the forbidden fruit when tempted by Satan). Discrimination against women is still blatantly apparent in Morocco. Whereas America has hidden repression of women’s rights, in Morocco religion allows these rights to be publicly stripped away. For example, forcing women to wear a head covering and keeping them out of the workplace is justified through Mohammed the Prophet. While in recent years laws have been enacted to protect and promote female independence, a visit to Morocco will show that in almost every rural or suburban area, these laws have been mostly ignored. Most women still continue to work in the home as domestic servants while men are free and more likely to continue their education and become professionals such as professors, scientists, or doctors. In only the most populated and foreign-filled places (in Casablanca, for example, it is not uncommon to find a native of France living and working), where Moroccans come into frequent contact with foreign ideologies and policies, is there an exception to this rule. However, Moroccan youth are also more likely to protest and hold demonstrations to fight for the rights of women, whereas American youth have grown complacent with their lot and life or don’t even realize the inequalities that exist. In America, women have the same “rights” as men, but they do not act on those rights. A women has the right to be a CEO, but she is unlikely to actually go for it, because her gender role states that it is unlikely for her to achieve this goal or that she shouldn’t. American and Moroccan inequalities differ widely on one point: LGBT issues. While America continues to grow more accepting of individuals who are lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, or transgendered, Morocco continues to view these members of their population as “unholy,” “diseased,” or “immoral” beings who ought to be completely removed or ignored from social spheres. Sometimes, violence is used as a measure to keep gays from coming out. The recent
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Cameron 10 American outrage at the Sochi, Russia games, where Putin enacted homophobic laws, would not have been considered ridiculous or outrageous to the average Moroccan individual. In fact, the majority of Moroccan citizens would probably have considered these laws to be beneficent. This
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