Michael Matthews Bigger Leaner Stronger The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body.pdf

Lets now talk form starting with the seated press the

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Let’s now talk form, starting with the seated press. The Seated Military Press Setup Place your feet flat on the ground about shoulder-width apart with your toes and knees slightly turned out. Press your heels into the ground to keep your upper back and butt rooted in place against the back of the bench. Grip the bar like you would during the bench press: about shoulder-width and the bar over your wrists, not in your fingers. Your back should be in a neutral position. The Seated Military Press Movement
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To begin the descent, take a deep breath, tighten your abs and glutes, and press your chest up. Bring the bar straight down toward your clavicle, and keep your elbows tucked like you would during the bench press (don’t force them to stay right at your sides and don’t let them slide too far behind you). Tilt your head back to allow the bar to pass your nose and chin and look forward, not straight up. (This is why a full bench doesn’t work for the military press: you can’t tilt your head back to get it out of the way and are forced to lower the weight lower down your chest, which is incorrect.) There should be a slight arch in your lower back at the bottom of the lift, but don’t overdo this as it can cause injury when you start loading more and more weight. If you’re arching too much, the weight is probably too heavy. Once the bar has reached your clavicle, raise it straight up along the path of descent, and once it passes your forehead, shift your torso a little forward and squeeze your glutes. Keep raising the bar until your elbows are locked: your shoulders, traps, and back should be tight and squeezed. The Standing Military Press Setup & Movement
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The standing press is performed in exactly the same way—you’re just standing. The bar rests on the squat rack at the same height as if you were squatting, and once you’ve unracked it, the movement is as described above. To recap: place the feet and grip shoulder-width apart, grip the bar like the bench press, keep the back neutral, descend straight to the clavicles, tilt the head back while looking forward, raise the bar along the same path, shift the torso forward slightly, squeeze the glutes, and lock out. HOW TO TRAIN THE BIGGER LEANER STRONGER WAY While the theory of “muscle confusion” is silly and scientifically bankrupt, it’s true that your body can respond favorably to doing new exercises after doing the same routine for a bit. Changing things up can also help keep you excited for and interested in your workouts, which improves overall results. Thus, the Bigger Leaner Stronger program calls for changing your routine every eight weeks. We’ll get more into the actual programming in the next chapter, but first I want to give you the list of “approved” exercises so you can build your own workouts as well as some general tips on training each muscle group.
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  • Winter '17
  • Santos O'Neill Garcia
  • History

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