Carbon dioxide and water react in atmosphere to form

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Unformatted text preview: Carbon dioxide and water react in atmosphere to form carbonic acid and this reacts with calcite, causing calcite to dissolve (solid to liquid) Dissolved Calcium Ca2+ Dissolved Bicarbonate 2HCO3- Example: Hydrolysis Carbon dioxide and water react in atmosphere to form carbonic acid Carbonic Acid Hydrogen Cation + Hydrogen Anion Carbonic acid with some additional water reacts with mineral orthoclase feldspar to form mineral kaolinite with some additional dissolved potassium and dissolved silica Orthoclase Feldspar Kaolinite + Dissolved Potassium and Sodium Example: Oxidation Olivine reacts with water and oxygen in atmosphere to form hematite and dissolved silicic acid Olivine + Water + Oxygen Hematite + Silicic Acid (dissolved) Rates of Weathering Climate Temperature—higher temperatures the rates of weathering (most chemical reactions occur more rapidly at warmer temperatures) Moisture (availability of water)—more water that is present more weathering that occur (water is most important chemical weathering agent) Tropical regions (warm, moist) have a much higher rates of weathering than polar regions (cold, dry) Desert regions (warm/cold, dry) have low rates of weathering—lack water. Composition of rocks/minerals Example—Silicate Minerals—Different Structures Olivine—simplest—easily weathers Quartz—most complex—weathers slowly Granite—weathers slowly—composed of silicate minerals Marble—weathers rapidly—composed of calcite 16:54 16:54...
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Carbon dioxide and water react in atmosphere to form...

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