Example 4 if 60 of a department stores customers are

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Example 4 : If 60% of a department store’s customers are female and 75% of the female customers have a store charge card, what is the probability that a customer selected at random is female and had a store charge card? Example 5: Suppose 5% of a box of 100 light blubs is defective. If a store owner tests two light bulbs from the shipment and will accept the shipment only if both work. What is the probability that the owner rejects the shipment? Example 6 : Dan can hit the bulls eye ½ of the time Daren can hit the bulls eye of the time Duane can hit the bulls eye ¼ of the time Given that someone hits the bulls eye, what is the probability that it is Dan? Homework: Day 1: pg 440 6-65, 68, 70 pg 454 6-86, 88 Day 2: 6.72, 73, 76, 81, 82, 94
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Chapter 6: Probability and Simulation: The Study of Randomness Chapter 6: Review Objectives: Students will be able to: Summarize the chapter Define the vocabulary used Know and be able to discuss all sectional knowledge objectives Complete all sectional construction objectives Successfully answer any of the review exercises Vocabulary: None new Probability Rules 0 ≤ P(X) ≤ 1 for any event X P(S) = 1 for the sample space S Addition Rule for Disjoint Events: P(A B) = P(A) + P(B) Complement Rule: For any event A, P(A C ) = 1 – P(A) Multiplication Rule: If A and B are independent, then P(A B) = P(A) × P(B) General Addition Rule (for nondisjoint) Events: P(E F) = P(E) + P(F) – P(E F) General Multiplication rule: P(A B) = P(A) × P(B | A) Probability Terms Disjoint Events: P(A B) = 0 Events do not share any common outcomes Independent Events: P(A B) = P(A) × P(B) (Rule for Independent events) P(A B) = P(A) × P(B | A) (General rule) P(B) = P(B|A) (lines 1 and 2 implications) Probability of B does not change knowing A At Least One: P(at least one) = 1 – P(none) From the complement rule [ P(A C ) = 1 – P(A) ] Impossibility: P(E) = 0 Certainty: P(E) = 1 Homework: pg 459 – 60; 6-98, 99, 101-106 Problem 1a: At a recent movie, 1000 patrons (560 females and 440 males) were asked whether or not they liked the film. In was determined that 355 females liked the film and 250 males said they enjoyed it also. If a person is randomly selected from the moviegoers what is the probability that the moviegoers was: a) male? b) a female and liked the film c) a male or someone who disliked the film? d) a male and disliked the film? e) a male given they liked the film? f) someone who liked the film given they were a female? g) Are sex and film preference independent? Problem 1b: If P(A) = .3 and P(B) = .45 and events A and B are mutually exclusive find P(A or B).
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Chapter 6: Probability and Simulation: The Study of Randomness Problem 1c: When spot-checked for safety, automobiles are found to defective tires 15% of the time, defective lights 25% of the time, and both defective tires and lights 8% of the time. Find the probability that a randomly chosen car has defective
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Example 4 If 60 of a department stores customers are female...

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