Rejection is a sensitive area for a depressed teen

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Rejection is a sensitive area for a depressed teen; specifically Romeo, who has a proliferating fear ofit. Discoursing with Benvolio about his feelings divulges a sudden realization about his sensations.Referring to Rosaline, Romeo cries, "She hath forsworn to love, and in that vow/Do I live dead thatlive to tell it now" (I, iv, 22). In Romeo's mind, Rosaline is being stubborn by waiting for true love--hewants her now and feels "dead" because she refuses to have him. By using the oxymoron "[. . .] I livedead" (I, iv, 22), Shakespeare is illustrating that Romeo feels like life is pointless until Rosalineaccepts him; if she does not love him, then who? Living dead is possible today; it causes the victim toportray a useless and abandoned behavior. Difficulty coping with fear, anger, and rejection is anotherobvious depression symptom ( 2). Still pouring his heart out toBenvolio, Romeo selfishly complains, "Well in that hit you miss. She'll not be hit" (I, i, 209). AlthoughRomeo has tried to capitalize on every ounce of his charm and flaunt every drop of his beauty,Rosaline still refuses to accept his love. Her negative responses trigger Romeo's feelings of self-doubt,hurt, and hopelessness.Romeo's childish conduct will never appeal to Rosaline; therefore, he feels that there is no promise inany future relationships. Changing his mind is discovered to be a more demanding task than expectedwhen Mercutio, making the most of his wit, coerces the following statement out of Romeo, "Underlove's heavy burden do I sink" (I, i, 22). Unrequited passion is treading heavily on Romeo's chest,causing him to regress into the darkest, most desolate areas of his soul. In a swift change of events,however, immediately after making this testimony he is swept away by the indescribable beauty ofJuliet Capulet. Romeo has faith that he will never be obligated to experience heartache again!Nevertheless, this is a tragedy, and his ecstasy is trounced when it is discovered that Juliet is his mortalenemy. Shocked, Romeo exclaims, "O dear account! My life is my foe's debt" (I, v, 120). The onephenomenal lady who has blessed him with inexpressible joy is in total control of his fate. Discoveringa deplorable truth of that magnitude would cause any human to become depressed; in fact, numerousdepression cases are caused by traumatic events such as conflicts with a boyfriend or girlfriend( 2).Hopelessness, sensitivity to denunciation, and social abandonment are just a few of the scores ofdepression symptoms. Still, Romeo does ultimately get what he desires--an infinity to spend withJuliet in eternal sleep. His loneliness, pain, and heartache went recognized in the most ghastly waypossible, although his heart's wishes were fulfilled. Depression is simply a tragic disorder that inflictsinsufferable emotional pain upon a human's mind. Shakespeare depicts the relation between despairand Romeo and Juliet best in the closing lines when the Prince declares, "For never was a story of

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