Make sure fire extinguishers and fire suppression

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Make sure fire extinguishers and fire suppression methods (e.g., sprinklers) are properly implemented and maintained. Promptly report any potentially hazardous situations. Your top priority in responding to any incident is to ensure the safety of others. In the event of a hazardous situation, clear people from the area or remove the danger before attempting other actions such as preventing or repairing damage to components. Also periodically review and update your Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs). An MSDS describes safe handling and disposal procedures for dangerous materials and can provide you with the knowledge to resolve an uncertain situation. Electrostatic Discharge 0:00-0:15 In this lesson, we're going to talk about electrostatic discharge, or ESD. As a PC technician, ESD is your worst enemy. You need to know what it is and how to mitigate its effects. What is a Static Charge? 0:16-0:59 A static charge is created whenever two objects come into contact with each other and then are separated. When the objects separate, one of the objects can steal electrons from the other object,which makes the first object negatively charged. The object that lost electrons becomes positively charged. The two objects now have different charge levels. An electrostatic discharge occurs when the two objects with the different charge levels come together. If one object that has a high positive chargecomes into contact with another object that has a high negative charge, the charge from the objectwith the higher electrical potential flows or jumps to the object with the lower potential. The result is an electrostatic shock. Damaging Components 1:00-1:52 As a technician, you need to understand that a computer component, such as a memory chip or a CPU, can be damaged by an electrostatic discharge as small as 100 volts or less. Now, when you hear 100 volts, it sounds like a lot. We're used to dealing with 110 volts from our wall outlets, so smaller DC voltages of 12, five, or 3.3 volts, inside the PC makes 100 volts sounds like a lot. But when we're talking about ESD, an ESD discharge must be about 3,000 volts before you can see it or feel it, so when you touch a doorknob and you get a shock, you're dealing with at least 3,000 volts. What that means is that you could be working on a PC system and be shocking the daylights out of the components in there and not even know it because the discharge is so small that you can't see or feel it, but it's enough to hurt the components. ESD Prevention 1:53-2:00 ESD is bad, but there are a number of steps that you can take to reduce the risk of ESD when you're working on a PC system. Discharge Yourself 2:01-2:19 First, discharge yourself before you touch any PC component. There's a lot of different ways you can do this, but the easiest way is to simply touch the case frame of the PC system. When you do that, any electrical potential or difference in potential that may have existed between you and the case is immediately discharged.
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