Who means more to me than you lines 847 849 oedipus

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reached this pitch of dark foreboding. Who means more to me than you?” (lines 847-849) Oedipus shows great loyalty to his wife by explaining his actions in the prophecy. She, however, continues to act as if there is no affiliation. She may truly not understand 2
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Oedipus’ obvious involvement or she may be trying to hide her identity from the city, but her failure to acknowledge Oedipus’ words do not stop him from revealing the truth. In this time, marital ties were very strong, yet Oedipus, in a way, betrays his wife by sharing this information, showing his alliance to his people. Rather than abuse his power as king, Oedipus admits to his people that he has committed incest. For a king to announce such a wretched act shows true humility because he is fully aware of the consequences of his actions. “O god—all come true, all burst to light! O light—now let me look my last on you! I stand revealed at last—cursed in my birth, cursed in my marriage, cursed in the lives I cut down with these hands!” (lines 1306-1310) Oedipus’ deed costs him his wife, mother, children, and kingship. Oedipus is aware that he is no longer capable of fulfilling his duties and expresses true kingship when he, in a way, removes himself from power. He rips off her brooches, the long gold pins holding her robes—and lifting them high, looking straight up into the points, he digs them down the sockets of his eyes, crying, “You, you’ll see no more the pain I suffered, all the pain I caused! Too long you looked on the ones you never should have seen, blind to the ones you longed to see, to know! Blind (lines 1402-1409) This act of gouging out his eyes depicts self-punishment for fulfilling the prophecy he heard so long ago. His intense reaction shows his dedication to his position as king. This action is also, ironically, motivated by Oedipus’ desire to no longer feel pain. Without his sight he is no longer burdened by the suffering associated with observing hardship.
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