Having confirmed that the medical assistant refilled the medication without the

Having confirmed that the medical assistant refilled

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Having confirmed that the medical assistant refilled the medication without the consent or knowledge of a practitioner and that the refill was for a patient that has not been seen over a year, the medical assistant clearly violated 2 rules/laws and implicated the healthcare business for prescribing medication for a patient not seen over a year (Snyder, 2012). The ethical dilemma is whether to or not to report the medical assistant to the board or legal authority because she has worked over 10 years without infractions and has experience. According to Caldicott & D’ Oronzio (2014) in the interest of the management and patient safety, the medical practice has to report the incident to the board. The management may decide not to report her, but may come back to hurt them. Furthermore, not doing so may implicate and negatively affect the management if the legal authority finds out later or something goes wrong with the patient. This may lead to litigation. The best alternative and ethical action is to report her to protect the management and ensure patient safety (Caldicott & D’ Oronzio, 2014).The management has to set up rules and penalties for writing prescription. References Caldicott CV, d’Oronzio JC. (2014). Ethics remediation, rehabilitation, and recommitment to medical professionalism: a programmatic approach. Ethics Behav. doi:10.1080/10508422.2014.930687. Elder, N.C. Jacobson, C.J. Bolon, S. K. Fixler, J. Pallerla, H. Busick, C. & Pugnale, M. (2014) Patterns of relation between physicians and medical assistants in small family medicine offices. Annals of Family Medicine , 12(2), 150-157. Doi: 10:1370/afm.158 McCarty, M. (2012). The Lawful Scope of Practice of Medical Assistants—2012 Update. AMT Events , 29 (2), 110-119. Retreived from http: // www. Americanmedtech.org/portals/0/pdf/new/scopeof practicearticle_june%202012.pdf
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Snyder, L. (2012). American College of Physicians Ethics, Professionalism, and Human Rights Committee. American College of Physicians Ethics Manual: sixth edition. Ann Intern Med. 156(1). DOI: 10.7326/0003-4819 1113-245 Show Less Instructor Romeo reply to Priscilla Afram Debrah 3/24/2017 10:07:14 AM RE: Re: Discussion two Hi Priscilla, just to be clear Stephanie did not "refill" an Rx she prescribed a new/original Rx for Amoxicillin. Not that it makes a huge difference since she does not have the authority to do either of these things on her own. Thanks, Dr. Romeo Show Less Tracey Putz 3/23/2017 11:56:39 PM Risk versus Benefit
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Professor Romeo and Classmates, This situation is a blatant disregard for scope of practice, not to mention the legal liability that Stephanie placed the Nurse Practitioner in who now appears to have prescribed a medication without seeing the patient, without a valid proof of diagnosis, or proper education and follow-up of the patient. Legally, there is a standard of care that the Nurse Practitioner (NP) must provide to the patient. The standard of care requires the NP to weigh the risks versus benefit and only prescribe when the benefit outweighs the risk, to continuously monitor the patient for side effects so that medication dosage may be adjusted accordingly, as well as to discuss any concerns or
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