References Elder N C Jacobson C J Bolon S K Fixler J Pallerla H Busick C

References elder n c jacobson c j bolon s k fixler j

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References Elder, N. C., Jacobson, C. J., Bolon, S. K., Fixler, J., Pallerla, H., Busick, C.,& ... Pugnale, M. (2014). Patterns of Relating Between Physicians and Medical Assistants in Small Family Medicine Offices. Annals of Family Medicine, 12(2), 150-157. doi:10.1370/afm.1581 Ulrich, C.M., Taylor, C., Soeken, K., O’Donnell, P., Farrar, A., Danis, M. and Grady, C. (2011) ‘Everyday ethics: Ethical issues and stress in nursing practice’, 66(11). Retrieved from: (July 26, 2017). Professor Response, Dear Vanessa, thanks for your post. You have addressed the legal issues and discussed ethical principles to consider in this case. You might be surprised to know that this is not unusual in primary care practices. In your current RN practice you may have witnessed this type of behavior by your RN colleagues. Have a nice evening. Anne
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Good evening Professor McGinley, This practice is seen very frequently, as you’ve said Professor. Although, most of the time though it’s more of an “informal verbal order” from the nurses to the physicians in my area of work. I personally have never worked in a primary care setting therefore; my first hand experience is limited. Regardless, having access to a prescription note pad seems rare these days considering how orders can be placed online. Stephanie shouldn’t have had the access to prescription writing in the first place. If a pad was indeed lying around it seems very irresponsible of the practice to have something like that so easily available to anyone. Also, Stephanie should have the honesty and decency to take the pad and put it away. This should fall under an administrative duty for her as an employee, according to Caperelli-White & Urman (2014), administrative duties must be defined, there should be competencies and credentialing, and if necessary pre-procedure evaluations. Regardless of her action now being in the past, Stephanie will need to be informed of her mistake, and the rest of the staff should be clarified of all duties according to scope of practice. Reference Caperelli-White, L., & Urman, R. D. (2014). Developing a moderate sedation policy: Essential elements and evidence-based considerations. Association of Operating Room Nurses.AORN Journal, 99 (3), 416-30. doi: Week 4: Discussion Part Three 2 2 unread replies. 2 2 replies. Due to the incident, you are concerned with office policies and procedure. Upon investigation, you find there isn’t a policy in place to address non- urgent patient requests for prescriptions. Discussion Question: What quality improvement strategies might you implement as an APN in this practice to safeguard your role and assure patient safety? Provide evidence to support your response. Good Evening Class Professor McGinely, When developing policy, there are essential policy elements that must be considered.
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