This kept the south in a sort of third world

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This kept the South in a sort of “Third World” servitude to the North. The South would supply raw materials to the metropolis of the North, but would be unable to develop its own industry.One example was the “Pittsburgh plus” pricing system in the Steel industry. This took advantage of iron ore deposits in Birmingham, AL, and stunted the South’s natural economic advantages.However, in the cotton textiles, the South fared better. Many wanted to bring the mills closer to the cotton, and so several cotton mills were erected in the South. The South was also able to provide cheap labor, and southern industrialists did everything they could to keep it cheap. Rural white southerners scrambled to seek employment at the new mills, and were paid half of what their counterparts in the North were being paid.Often, they received credit at a company store, where they were habitually in debt. Despite this, the southerners appreciated the mills as the first steady jobs and wages they had ever received. The Impact of the New Industrial Revolution on AmericaAfter the Civil War, the wealth of the United States, along with the standard of living, rose sharply. Industrial workers enjoyed more comforts than those in Europe, and urban centers boomed.Agriculture gave way to manufacturing, and Jeffersonian ideals were being thrown away. Federal intervention was now proving to be necessary in economic affairs.People now lived according to the factory whistle instead of nature, and industrial discipline did not come easy for some.
Perhaps the most astounding effect that the new industrial age had was on women, who could now holdtheir own jobs and discover economic and social opportunities.The “Gibson Girl” became the romantic ideal of the age. However, women faced the same long hours as their male counterparts and earned less for “women’s jobs.”The industrial age created clear class division between the extravagant, oligarchical millionaires and the wage earners. Dependence on wages was dangerous, and many reformers sought job and wage protection for the working class. The demand for foreign trade also tired American industry.Examining the EvidenceThis picture is of child laborers, taken by Lewis W. Hine, who was the photographer for the National ChildLabor Committee. This committee sought to end the abuse that was child labor.The photo is from 1909, and depicts two young “doffers” who dangerously climbed on moving machines to remove their bobbins. Children also worked in coal mines, fish canneries, and on beet farms.Hine’s photographs contributed to the end of child labor during the New Deal era. He is also seen as one of the fathers of documentary photography.

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