ii No I am not Prince Hamlet nor was meant to be Am an attendant lord one that

Ii no i am not prince hamlet nor was meant to be am

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ii) “No! I am not Prince Hamlet, nor was meant to be;Am an attendant lord, one that will doTo swell a progress, start a scene or two,Advise the prince; no doubt, an easy tool,Deferential, glad to be of use, Politic, cautious, and meticulous;Full of high sentence, but a bit obtuse; At times, indeed, almost ridiculous— Almost, at times, the Fool.” (The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock, 146-154).It is interesting how he compares himself to the “politic, cautious, and meticulous” Polonius from Hamlet, however one can argue that he is more like Hamlet in the sense that his hamartia is similar to Hamlet’s uncertainty and indecision. His lack of confidence is in addition to his hesitancy, adding another aspect to his hamartia in which the audience pities him. (source: ) *SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES IN 2ndBODY PARAGRAPH*Significance (Relate your evidence to your claim. How does this argument help to prove your thesis?):The audience pities all three characters to create a stronger connection with them. However, eachsituation differs from the other, giving alternative reasoning to the audience’s pity. Agamemnon sacrificed his daughter and speaks condescendingly towards his wife, creating pity for an innocent death and for his wife who was poorly mistreated. Hamlet’s pity comes from
questioning life itself and mistreating Ophelia due to a madness that is created from an obsessionwith avenging his father’s death. He screams at Ophelia and mistreats her similar to Clytemnestra. Prufrock pathetically outcasts himself in a way that causes the audience to pity his state of mind and lack of confidence. He compares himself to Polonius from Hamlet, recognizingthat he is not a prince of a royal family, but simply an attendant lord, happy to serve the prince and ‘glad to be of use’. Ironically, his hamartia is still similar to Hamlet’s so the audience comparably commiserates the two.SIMILARITIES:DIFFERENCES:Third Point CONSEQUENCEClaim (Your argument for this paragraph): Each tragic hero receives their own form of consequence, albeit unknowingly. As the audience has a specific insight to the plotline, their curiosity in every conclusion peaks. Evidence (Your sources, quotations, etc.): 3 A): Agamemnon From defying the Gods and sacrificing his daughter for war to infidelity and condescendingly mistreating his wife, Agamemnon’s arrogance and acts of hubris unknowingly lead him to his final demise. He consequently dies at the hands of his own wife, Clytemnestra, who stabbed him with a knife after trapping him in a net while he was in the bath. Later, she is validating herself tothe chorus as to why it was right to murder him: quote: “Say not thou that he did dieBy unworthy death inglorious,Erst himself prevailed by damned Deceit victorious,Then when he killed the deep-lamented Iphigenía, nor relentedWhen for my body’s fruit with weeping I besought him. Springs his reaping From what seed he sowed. Not he In Hades housed shall boast to-day; So slain by steel as he did

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