Revolving fund of the Pan American Health Organization Philippine Water

Revolving fund of the pan american health

This preview shows page 14 - 17 out of 96 pages.

Revolving fund of the Pan American Health Organization Philippine Water Revolving Fund New sources of finance Land value capture Local property tax to fund K 12 education in the US. Railway systems in Japan, Singapore, Hong Kong, Beijing, and Delhi Social and green bonds and innovation funds Global Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fund DC Water green bond Surtaxes on consumption Unitaid airline tax
Image of page 14
M O B I L I Z I N G A D D I T I O N A L F U N D S F O R P R O - P O O R W A T E R S E R V I C E S 7 Based on interviews and consultations with Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), we narrowed our research to look at three models that seemed most promising for a sustainable subsidy approach: global philanthropy-led partnerships and funds global, non-regressive surtaxes on private consumption, such as surcharges imposed by airlines on certain fares, taxes on tobacco, or a tax on bottled water land value capture and other local sources of finance that can be combined with additional philanthropic capital We selected these three models for different reasons. They have all raised significant international and domestic resources for other sectors, fundamentally altered how donors and the private sector collaborate, and provided reliable, automatic contributions without yearly renewals, allowing a longer planning and implementation horizon. The three models have all raised significant international and domestic resources for other sectors, fundamentally altered how donors and the private sector collaborate, and provided reliable, automatic contributions without yearly renewals, allowing a longer planning and implementation horizon. In the following sections, we summarize the current discourse on the need for additional resources to meet Sustainable Development Goal 6. Because much of the current dialogue on innovative financing focuses on mobilizing commercial finance, we briefly examine the role that private capital can play in filling these gaps. We then move on to a detailed examination of two financing models from the health sector and one from transport that have been successful but have not been used to the same extent by the water sector. We outline the opportunities and costs associated with each model and discuss their relevance to the water sector. While the purpose of this st udy is not the recommendation of “how” additional resources should be allocated, we also propose a model that integrates philanthropic and private capital in a global fund and suggest mechanisms through which such a fund might prioritize investments and incentivize improved outcomes. In this study, we do not focus specifically on a country-level analysis of the suitability of
Image of page 15
8 M O B I L I Z I N G A D D I T I O N A L F U N D S F O R P R O - P O O R W A T E R S E R V I C E S funding mechanisms given that two of the three we highlight are international and philanthropy driven.
Image of page 16
Image of page 17

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 96 pages?

  • Summer '20
  • Dr joseph
  • The Land, Water supply, Drinking water, Water industry, Public utility, Millennium Development Goals, global Fund, The Grave

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture