Its the music supervisors job to keep all these

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It’s the music supervisor’s job to keep all these competing interests satisfied and to ensure a happy ending. So good music supervisors are worth their weight in gold (maybe platinum). They call on their relationships to pull favors and smooth out difficult situations, getting music into pictures that couldn’t be there any other way. Music supervisors are in a sense “marriage brokers.” They creatively marry music and films, which is no easy process, as well as marry the two industries on a business level (which is even more difficult).
Unfortunately, because the film industry went into distress and the number of films being produced dropped radically, the number of music supervisor jobs shrank as well. There was a double whammy: there aren’t very many films with a big enough music budget to afford a supervisor, and a lot of this work went in-house (meaning studio employees now do the work) because it’s cheaper. But there are still music-intensive films that have supervisors, even smaller budget ones, and television shows with heavy music (like Empire ) use them regularly. The supervisors that are working, however, still get paid nicely. How nicely? FEES AND ROYALTIES Music supervisors can get fees of $25,000 to $100,000 per picture (sometimes even more). The top supervisors also have royalties on the soundtrack album, usually in the range of 1% to 2% non-pro-rated. There may also be escalations of .25% or .5% at 500,000 and 1,000,000 units. These royalties are payable prospectively after recoupment of all costs, at the same time the film studio recoups. In addition, there may be box-office bonuses based on the picture’s gross, just like the deals for composers that we discussed on page 475 . TELEVISION SUPERVISORS Over the years, a few television shows have licensed extensive amounts of existing music to create a “cool vibe” for the show. Because of the rushed production time frame in television, and the smaller budgets, and the fact that television producers’ music departments simply aren’t equipped to deal with the complicated clearance issues we’ve just discussed, this is a tough thing to pull together. Stepping in to save the day are music supervisors who work on television shows. The fees are pretty small—$3,500 to $5,500 for a half-hour episode, and up to $8,000 for an hour. If there are records, downloads, or streams, supervisors can get a royalty of about 1%, sometimes with sales escalations. A recent trend in this area is for music supervisors to troll indie labels, music blogs, YouTube, and similar sites, looking for unknown artists with
cool material. They then approach the artist or label and say, “We love your song. We’d like to put it on a TV show, which is a great way to promote your career. And if you wrote the song, you’ll even get performance money when it’s aired. Oh, by the way, we pay almost nothing.” The artists are usually thrilled, because it can mean massive exposure for their material.
33 Soundtrack Album Deals As an artist, you have nothing to do with the deal to distribute a soundtrack album—not even consent or consultation. These contracts are made

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