Killing_us_softly_Investigating_in_the_aesthetics_philosophy_and_influence_of_Nordic_Noir_television

This is suggested in its conclusion when it becomes

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is an island and that every individual action will influence the rest of a community. This is suggested in its conclusion when it becomes clear how Martin’s own irresponsible actions actually motivated the central crime, revealing a universe where everything and everyone is implicitly linked. 19 DR producer Sven Clausen refers to such a philosophy as ‘a theory of interdependence’ (cited by Redvall 2013b: 166) i.e. the notion that every individual action will inevitably influence the whole community. 20 In particular, such ideas appear to reflect present anxieties concerning the Scandinavian loss of belief in the creation of a utopian society. According to Kerstin Bergman, its troubled heroes ‘react both physically and mentally to the problems of society, and they are particularly, and most explicitly, disillusioned by the dissolving of the welfare state’ (2011: 35). Thus, dramas like The Bridge and The Killing implicitly articulate an underlining fear that the power of the state has been subsumed by a global capitalism which believes that ‘there is no such thing as society’ 18 From 1448 to 1790 the two kingdoms were almost always at war, while today there still exists an inherited cultural competition between the two countries. 19 Their trail eventually leads them to a Danish policeman and former close friend of Martin's who is seeking revenge after discovering his colleague’s affair with his late wife. 20 It seems that Sveistrup was particularly interested in ‘the butterfly effect’ (see Redvall 2013: 166), a concept originally coined by Edward Lorenz that is derived from the theoretical example of a hurricane being dependent on whether or not a distant butterfly had flapped its wings several weeks earlier (see Lorenz 2001). Put crudely, it argues that a single occurrence, no matter how small, can change the course of the universe. 7
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(Thatcher 1987). In contrast, these dramas implicitly reveal that society does exist and is made up of millions of individuals that are all intimately connected, a world where a single action can cause a never-ending series of ripples across a whole community. It is not just Nordic Noir that appears to hint at such a theory. Notice, for example, how large ensemble sagas like Lost (2004-10), Heroes (2006-10) and The Returned (2012 - ) often tend to single out one character for each episode, allowing their personal backstory to be developed while also revealing and explaining how that character and their actions currently influences the social and moral dynamics of their own particular community. However, what makes Nordic Noir so distinctive is the sense of realism embedded in its very fabric. None of the stories explicitly involve supernatural events to explain the interconnectedness of its different characters and storylines. There is certainly no fantasy island, superheroes or paranormal occurrences here, just wet urban streets and sanitised public institutions. As such, it reveals an aesthetic blending of social realism and film noir that is also at the very heart of its moral, political and philosophical critique.
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