33 Status of Classical Arabic Classical Arabic is understood to be the language

33 status of classical arabic classical arabic is

This preview shows page 5 - 7 out of 10 pages.

3.3. Status of Classical Arabic Classical Arabic is understood to be the language that developed from the varieties of Bedouin tribes in Arabian Peninsula, as recorded in the pre-Islamic poetry (Ferguson, 1959) . Due to Quran was revealed in Arabic, it has a sacred and prestigious position not only among the Arabs but rather all Muslims across the world. All Muslims around the world are required to learn Arabic to be able to carry out their religious acts properly. Farghaly (2012) declares that despites its consistency over 1500 years, Classical Arabic is neither the native nor spoken language of any group; nor is it the language of the contemporary writing. Ennaji (2002) mentions that “the Muslim fundamentalists go even further to claim that only classical Arabic is worth teaching and learning because it reflects Muslim tradition, belief and values” (Ennaji, 2002) . He confirms that Arabic is associated with identity, roots, cultural authenticity and tradition. Therefore, Classical Arabic is regarded by many scholars as the “real language” whereas the various colloquial dialects of Arabic are distorted forms of this pure la nguage. It is worth mentioning that the revelation of the Holy Quran in Classical Arabic along with the recognition of Arabic as the “Word of God” ( kalimatullah ) contributed to getting Classical Arabic a high sacred status among all Muslims irrespective of their regional affiliations and nationalities. Haeri (2003) reports that most classical languages disappeared: Sanskrit came to be replaced by the local regional languages of India such as Hindi, Urdu, Bengali etc, and Latin eventually gave way to the Europeans vernaculars, generation by generation, genre by genre, and domain by domain until even the Vatican stopped required it to be the language of prayers (Haeri, 2003) . On the contrary, Classical Arabic could have retained its purity and linguistic features over 1500 years due to its religious status as a language of Quran being recited daily and mostly five times a day (in the prayers) by all Muslims across the world. Such constant use of Classical Arabic during the frequent religious sermons gave it away to be “eternal” in that it did not die away when its speakers ceased to use it in their day to day communication and instead they had recourse to the use of their various regional vernaculars. Moreover, every Friday, all Muslims are required to gather in the mosques of their localities to listen to the weekly-based oration ( Xutbah ) delivered in Classical Arabic. Thus, all factors cited above have helped Arabic preserve its dynamic practicality over the years. 2
English Literature and Language Review , 2015, 1(4): 28- 36 32 3.4. Modern Standard Arabic Modern Standard Arabic is the written language used for all Arabic books, newspapers, street signs, magazines, official documents, and business- related materials. Most educated Arabic speakers are able to use MSA as a “lingua franca” to communicate with one another regardless their nationalities or spoken native dialects. It is almost

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture