Microsoft_Press_ebook_Introducing_Windows_Server_2012_R2_PDF.pdf

Most enterprise class ethernet switches support lacp

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most enterprise-class Ethernet switches support LACP, you generally need to enable it on selected switch ports before it can be used. So LACP is less work to configure than Static Teaming, but still more work to set up than switch independent teaming which is the default option for Windows NIC Teaming. The bottom line then is that Switch Independent teaming is generally your best choice to select for the teaming mode when creating a new NIC Team for two reasons. First, you don’t need to perform any configuration on the Ethernet switch to get it working. And second, you can gain two kinds of fault tolerance: Protection against the failure of a NIC in the team Protection against the failure of an Ethernet switch connected to a teamed NIC (when you are connecting different teamed NICs to different Ethernet switches) However, there are a couple of scenarios described later where Switch Dependent teaming might be the best choice if your Ethernet switches support such functionality and you’re up to configuring it. Choosing the right load-balancing mode Let’s say you’ve chosen Switch Independent teaming as the teaming mode for a new NIC team you’re creating. Your next decision is which load-balancing mode you’re going to use. As described in the previous section, NIC Teaming in Windows Server 2012 supports two different load-balancing modes: Address Hash or Hyper-V Port. Windows Server 2012 R2 adds a third option for load-balancing mode called Dynamic. First, when should you use Address Hash load-balancing mode?
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96 CHAPTER 5 Networking The main limitation of the Address Hash load-balancing approach is that inbound traffic can only be received by a single member of the team. The reason for this has to do with the underlying operation of how address hashing uses IP addresses and TCP ports to seed the hash function. So a scenario where this could be the best choice would be if your server was running the kind of workload where inbound traffic is light while outbound traffic is heavy. Sound familiar? That’s exactly what a web server like IIS experiences in terms of network traffic. Incoming HTTP/HTTPS requests are generally short streams of TCP traffic. What gets pumped out in response to such requests, however, can include text, images, and video. So when should you use Hyper-V Port load-balancing mode? This load balancing approach affinitizes each Hyper-V port (such as each virtual machine) on a Hyper-V host to a single NIC in the team at any given time. Basically what you get here is no load balancing from the virtual machine’s perspective. Each virtual machine can only utilize one teamed NIC at a time, so maximum inbound and outbound throughput for the virtual machine is limited to what’s provided by a single physical NIC on the host.
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