Acute streptococcal bronchitis with acute exacerbation of COPD J202 Acute

Acute streptococcal bronchitis with acute

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Acute streptococcal bronchitis with acute exacerbation of COPD J20.2 Acute bronchitis due to streptococcus J44.0 Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with acute lower respiratory infection J44.1 Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with (acute) exacerbation Explanation : ICD-1 0 -CM uses combination codes to create organism-specific classifications for acute bronchitis. Category J44 codes include combination codes with severity components, which differentiate between COPD with acute lower respiratory infection (acute bronchitis), COPD with acute exacerbation, and COPD without mention of a complication (unspecified). An acute exacerbation is a worsening or a decompensation of a chronic condition. An acute exacerbation is not equivalent to an infection superimposed on a chronic condition, though an exacerbation may be triggered by an infection, as in this example. Exacerbation of moderate persistent asthma with status asthmaticus J45.42 Moderate persistent asthma with status asthmaticus Explanation : Category J45 Asthma includes severity-specific subcategories and fifth-character codes to distinguish between uncomplicated cases, those in acute exacerbation, and those with status asthmaticus. Acute hypoxic respiratory failure due to COPD exacerbation J96.01 Acute respiratory failure with hypoxia J44.1 Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with (acute) exacerbation Explanation : Category J96 classifies respiratory failure with combination codes that designate the severity and the presence of hypoxia and hypercapnia. Code J96.01 is sequenced as the first-listed diagnosis, as the reason for the admission. Respiratory failure may be assigned as a principal diagnosis when it is the condition established after study to be chiefly responsible for occasioning the admission to the hospital and the selection is supported by the Alphabetic Index and Tabular List. Acute respiratory failure due to accidental oxycodone overdose T40.2X1A Poisoning by other opioids, accidental (unintentional), initial encounter J96.00 Acute respiratory failure, unspecified whether with hypoxia or hypercapnia Explanation : Respiratory failure may be assigned as a principal diagnosis when it is the condition established after study to be chiefly responsible for occasioning the admission to the hospital, and the selection is supported by the Alphabetic Index and Tabular List. However, chapter-specific coding guidelines, such as poisoning, that provide sequencing direction take precedence. When coding a poisoning or reaction to the improper use of a medication (e.g. overdose, wrong substance given or taken in error, wrong route of administration), first assign the appropriate code from categories T36–T50. Use additional code(s) for all manifestations of the poisoning. In this instance, the respiratory failure is a manifestation of the poisoning and is sequenced as a secondary diagnosis.
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