1 federal deposit insurance corporation fdic of 1933

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1. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) of 1933 2. Securities Exchange Commission (1934) 3. Federal Housing Administration (1934) 4. Social Security Act (1935) 5. “Roosevelt coalition” in the Election of 1936 Key Concept 7.2: Innovations in communications and technology contributed to the growth of mass culture, while significant changes occurred in internal and international migration patterns. I. Popular culture grew in influence in U.S. society, even as debates increased over the effects of culture on public values, morals, and American national identity. A. New forms of mass media, such as radio and cinema, contributed to the spread of national culture as well as greater awareness of regional cultures. 1. Radio, KDKA (1920) 2. War of the Worlds (1938) 3. FDR’s fireside chats 4. Motion pictures 5. Nickelodeons 6. Movie palaces 7. Jazz Singer (1927) 8. Steamboat Willie (1928) B. Migration gave rise to new forms of art and literature that expressed ethnic and regional identities, such the Harlem Renaissance movement. 1. Jazz Age 2. Edward Hopper 3. Langston Hughes 4. Zora Neale Hurston 5. Yiddish theater
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4 07 APUSH (27-35) (1890-1945) (Frameworks) 6. Harlem Renaissance 7. Gertrude Stein’s “lost generation” 8. Sinclair Lewis’s Babbitt (1922) 9. F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby (1925) C. Official restrictions on freedom of speech grew during World War I, as increased anxiety about radicalism led to a Red Scare and attacks on labor activism and immigrant culture. 1. Red Scare 2. Immigration Act of 1917 3. Espionage and Sedition Acts (1917-1918) 4. Schenck v. US ( 1919) 5. Palmer Raids (1920) 6. execution of Sacco and Vanzetti (1927) D. In the 1920s, cultural and political controversies emerged as Americans debated gender roles, modernism, science, religion, and issues related to race and immigration. 1. Flappers 2. fundamentalism vs. modernism 3. Scopes “Monkey” Trial (1925) II. Economic pressures, global events, and political developments caused sharp variations in the numbers, sources, and experiences of both international and internal migrants. A. Immigration from Europe reached its peak in the years before World War I. During and after World War I, nativist campaigns against some ethnic groups led to the passage of quotas that restricted immigration, particularly from southern and eastern Europe, and increased barriers to Asian immigration. 1. Immigration Act of 1917, Emergency Quota Act of 1921, National Origins Immigration Act of 1924 B. The increased demand for war production and labor during World War I and World War II and the economic difficulties of the 1930s led many Americans to migrate to urban centers in search of economic opportunities. 1. War Industries Board (1917) 2. National War Labor Board (1918) 3. dust bowl (1930-1936) 4. John Steinbeck’s Grapes of Wrath (1939) 5. Office of War Mobilization (1943) C. In a Great Migration during and after World War I, African Americans escaping segregation, racial violence, and limited economic opportunity in the South moved to the North and West, where they found new opportunities but still encountered discrimination.
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