Passage 5 1 a yes this is an advertisement for a

Info icon This preview shows pages 9–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Passage 5 1. a) Yes. This is an advertisement for a Whatsit. Thus, the advertising company has a vested financial interest in selling as many Whatsits as possible. See pp. 31–33.
Image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Good Reasoning Matters! A Constructive Approach to Critical Thinking , Fifth Edition © Oxford University Press Canada, 2012 2. b) No. A conflict of interest exists in cases where we expect a certain amount of detachment from the arguer, and the arguer fails to be detached. We don’t expect advertisers to be detached, so there’s no possibility of a conflict of interest. See pp. 34–35. 3. a) Yes. The ad does not discuss the downsides of a Whatsit. We also have no idea of whether the alternatives to a Whatsit are better. And it’s not entirely clear what a Whatsit is. These are all pretty significant omissions, and they all serve to slant the argument. See pp. 36–38. 4. c) It’s impossible to tell. It’s certainly unlikely that any actual product could do all the things listed, but that’s not necessarily a case of distortion. Unless we know more about what a Whatsit is, there’s no reason to believe that the information given is actually manipulated or misstated. Overall, more information is needed to determine if this is a distortion (by grossly exaggerating what a Whatsit does) or a straightforward statement about a miraculous new technology. See pp. 38–40. 5. c) It does not, and should not. Advertisements are arguments, but we usually expect them to be one-sided, so even though this doesn’t consider opposing views, we probably wouldn’t expect it to. Leaving them out is thus not a serious defect. That said, anyone considering buying a Whatsit would be advised to consider the alternate view themselves. See pp. 40–41. Passage 6 1. a) Yes. First, the CEO is a shareholder, so she has a financial interest in issues that might affect share prices, such as company earnings. Second, the CEO presumably wants to keep her job. Thus, she has an interest in persuading her audience that losses and other problems are temporary. See pp. 31–33. 2. a) Yes. This one is a little tricky. We expect CEOs to favour their company’s interests, and, to some extent, their own, so we don’t hold them to the same standards as, say, judges. However, a CEO does have responsibilities to, for example, shareholders and a board of directors, responsibilities that require some amount of detachment. Given that the CEO is making an argument that affects both her financial interests and her professional ones, it seems that she is in a (minor) conflict of interest. See pp. 34–35. 3. a) Yes. This is a more subtle case. Certainly, the CEO does include some counter-arguments. For example, she discusses reasons why first-quarter losses are nothing to be concerned about. However, there are other things she leaves out. Are these the only reasons why shareholders might be concerned? We don’t know, as the CEO doesn’t say. Are there other things that might make the company unsound? It’s possible, but the CEO does not discuss them. These omissions do slant the argument. See pp. 36–38.
Image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern