Weight management includes the low calorie diet and moderate to intense

Weight management includes the low calorie diet and

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management includes the low-calorie diet and moderate to intense exercise on a regular basis. Comorbidities are also well managed such as Hemoglobin A1c less than 6% and fasting blood glucoses within the reference range. Weight reduction has positive effects on cardiometabolic risks with lowered cholesterol and triglycerides and lowered blood pressure. Resolution of sleep apnea has occurred, and the patient is sleeping soundly now, feeling more rested each morning. The patient has taken the time to learn about obesity and its risks and understands they must be proactive where weight is concerned. Sometimes, this patient can act as personal example and give testimony to his or her weight loss efforts. This patient is now able to be more active, have more strength and stamina, play an active role within the family unit, and feel productive.Ideally, the patient will have access to nutritious food, exercise facilities, medications, physicians,and healthcare facilities. The patient will have the financial resources to acquire medications and healthy, nutritious foods. Their physicians and staff and family encourage them in their weight loss/maintenance efforts.The patient understands treatment options and has bought into the plan. He understands that diet and exercise are the keys to a healthy weight and that drugs are temporary. If appropriate, the patient understands what he must do in order to qualify for bariatric surgery, what the surgery entails and its risks, and how to adapt to the changes post-surgical procedure.
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Running Head: Obesity15The lifespan of the unmanaged obese person is 14 years less than a person of normal BMI (NIH, 2013). According to this information, the patient who is losing weight and BMI is trending down stands togain years on their life.A3a. DisparitiesData from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (2017) informs us that obesity affects over one-third (36%) of American adults and17% of its youth. In Mississippi (my home state), obesity affects 37.3% of the population and within my home county, Tallahatchie, 50% are considered obese. Combining overweight and obese, a full 71.3% +/- 1.8% of the Mississippi population is affected (Trust for America’s Health, 2017). Nationwide, obesity affects 35.1% of U. S. adults and 16.9% of children. Additionally, 33.5% of adult males and 36.1% of adult females are obese. These numbers are astounding and confounding. Studies have been done to assess practically every aspect of the obesity epidemic, yet no firm solutions have risen to the top. Obesity is labeled the poor person’s disease for a reason. Generally, persons of lower socioeconomic and financial status suffer from overweight and obesity, whereas, people with higher incomes and/or who have a bachelor’s or higher degree have normal BMI and weights. People without the financial means to afford more expensive fresh fruit and vegetables spend their money on the cheaper and deadlier high-fat, low nutrient fast food. Not only do they eat these foods, they feed this to their children which contributes to the childhood obesity epidemic. These factors and disparities have ensured the top obesity spot for the
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