Second jefferson states john lockes theories of

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Second, Jefferson states John Locke’s theories of natural rights of life, liberty, andproperty of all citizens possess, which the government ought to protect. Jefferson pronounces,“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed bytheir Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuitof Happiness. That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men (Jefferson 1),”outlining the gist of Locke’s principle and pointing out the main fundamental rights of allcitizens. Jefferson uses the term “pursuit of Happiness” instead of “property” in order to cover allaspects within a person’s self-interest. He also points out that governments exist solely in orderto protect the unalienable right of mankind and not to impose potency of the consent of thegovernment. Jefferson’s statement, “whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive ofthese ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government,laying its foundation on such principles (Jefferson 1),” specifies that it is the right of the peopleto overthrow and get rid of the government, if the government proves to be tyrannical and fails toprotect the natural rights of the people. It also illustrates that it is the consent of the United Statesto eliminate the destructive force of the British government and to substitute it with an enhancedgovernment which will follow the philosophy of defending the natural rights of all Americans.Hence, the document clearly relies upon the theories of John Locke, in order to support itspurpose.Third, Jefferson lays out the wrongdoings of King George III, communicating how thegovernment has failed to carry out its duties and why it is the right of the Americans tooverthrow the British government out of the United States. Jefferson remarks, “He has refused to
Dewri 3pass other Laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those people would

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