The study tested the usefulness of the 10 rule in hand rehabilitation It

The study tested the usefulness of the 10 rule in

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strength than the nondominant hand. The study tested the usefulness of the 10% rule in hand rehabilitation. It included subjects of different genders and sizes and showed an overall 10.74% grip strength between dominant and nondominant hands (Hogrel et al. 1989). The individual grip strength data in the Grip Strength Comparison lab, however, showed a 2.15% greater grip strength of the left hand than the right hand. Errors include a distraction while gripping with the right hand that caused a loss of focus and less grip, or general loss of maximum effort in gripping the sensor with the right hand. Looking at the class grip strength data, the right hand average mean force of right-handed individuals was 21.20% greater than the average mean force of the left hand and the left hand average mean force of left-handed individuals was 69.54% greater than right-handed individuals. These high percentage values could be due to the subjects’ lack of force on the sensor with their nondominant hand and a much larger force with their dominant hand. There is definitely a correlation between “handedness” and grip strength that surpasses the 10% rule. Subjects who are right-handed demonstrated a larger grip strength with their right hand than their left and subjects who were left handed demonstrated a larger grip strength with their left hand than their right. The class grip strength data depicting average mean force of dominant hand grip strength in males and females showed a higher mean force in males, with the maximum reading 564 N and only 210.5 N. The difference between the average mean forces of the two genders was 134.13 N. In table 4, one can see a direct correlation between height and grip strength; as height increases, the average mean grip strength of the dominant hand also increases, and this trend can be seen in figure 3 as well, with the largest reading at a subject whose height falls above 6’1”. There is a difference of 334.67 N in the average mean grip strengths between the largest height interval and the smallest height interval. However, as the height increased from 5’ or below to 5’9”-6’, there was only an increase of 25-92 N between each interval, but a 153 N increase from 5’9”-6’ to 6’1” and above. This demonstrates that biological sex plays a more significant role in grip strength than height or “handedness,” because there was only a 30 N difference between right and left hand grip strength in right-handed individuals and a 74 N 12
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difference between the two hands in left-handed individuals. The difference in grip strength between males and females was 134 N, a greater difference than what was shown in the data of height or handedness. According to the pinch strength data in table 5, there is a larger difference between pinch strength of the index finger and the little finger, a mean force difference of 34.35 N. The decrease began when switching from the index finger to the middle finger, which decreased by 14.25 N. There was only a 6.6 N decrease from the middle finger to the ring finger and a 13.5 N decrease from the ring finger to the little finger. Because the tendons in the middle and ring
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