Adopt to choose or take at ones self as a child as an

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Introduction to Psychology
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Chapter 7 / Exercise 2
Introduction to Psychology
Kalat
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Adopt (to choose or take at one’s self, as a child, as an option, or a course of action)We must adopt your suggestions.2.Advice (a noun meaning counsel or suggestions of information).Our company welcomes your advice.Advise (a verb meaning to counsel)He advises me on personnel management.3.Affect (a verb meaning to modify or influence)Your wife’s behavior affects your career.Effect (maybe a noun or verb; as a noun, it means outcome or result);as a verb, itmeans to accomplish or bring about)The effect of radiation is damaging. (noun)I want to effect changes in the community. (verb)
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Introduction to Psychology
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Chapter 7 / Exercise 2
Introduction to Psychology
Kalat
Expert Verified
4.Course (career, direction or line of motion)In the course of our conversation, I learned his motives.Coarse (rough, not refined)He has a coarse language5.Eminent (distinguished)He is an eminent statistician.Imminent (impending, about to happen)It would have been an imminent disaster had the soldier not taken the rescue.6.Price (the amount of money asked or given for something; cost; value; worth)The price of this percolator is commensurate to its durability. Price (as noun, something offered or given to a person winning in a contest.The prize is a given to the hundredth buyer of the percolator.7.Illicit (an adjective meaning unlawful)She is having an illicit affair.Elicit (a verb meaning to draw out information, etc.)I elicit the information that their transaction was illicit.8.Complement (full number of quantity, a complete set; to supply a deficiency)The office drapes complement the oil painting.Compliment (a formal act or expression of courtesy; to flatter or praise)I heard an honest compliment about his exemplary behavior.9.their (belonging to them; used attributively)Your sheriff intends to confiscate their property.there (in the place; at that point or stage)There is that questionable property for confiscation.10. stationary (fixed; not moving)His assignment is stationary in nature.Stationery (writing material)He uses the first- class stationery in his office.4. Complete – Completeness in report in writing means that all the factsdiscovered during the conduct of investigation must be reported. Do notomit some facts just to attain brevity. This will mislead the reader particularly if decision-making is involved. Partially stated facts are misleading as falsehoods.Your report must answer the who, what, when, where, why, and howquestions. It must also contain the elements of the offense (corpus delicti)and your probable cause to stop, detain, arrest, search, and seize. Your memoryis not sufficient to assure the completeness of the reports. Proper note-takingtechniques assure you will write complete reports.The Five W’s in Report Writing:Who was involved? – You need to include all victims, witnesses and suspects.It is up to you to locate everyone involved at the scene.

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