People in the Indian sub continent have long used Moringa pods for food The

People in the indian sub continent have long used

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People in the Indian sub-continent have long used Moringa pods for food. The edible leaves are eatenin parts of West Africa and Asia.Scientific research has proved that Moringa leaves are a powerhouse of nutritional value. But unfortunately, this information has not reached the people who need it most – like the people of Eastern Sudan. All parts of Moringa are useful and have beneficial properties that can serve and help save humanity.For instance the leaves and pods not only provide for nutrition, but medicine for diseases like skin infections, anemia, asthma, respiratory disorders, diabetes, bronchitis, diarrhea, eye and ear infections, headaches, blood pressure, scurvy, tuberculosis, ulcers, dysentery, gonorrhea, jaundice, urinary disorders, colitis, malaria and many others.Moringa flowers, seeds, bark, gum and roots are also medicine of the same diseases. The seeds are further used for water purification and oil extraction for cosmetics, lubricants and edible oil.“Moringa shows great promise as a tool to help overcome some of the most severe problems in the Eastern Province, malnutrition, deforestation, impure water and poverty. The tree does best in the dry regions where these problems are worst.A comparative study of Moringa fresh leaves gram for gram with other foodstuffs puts Moringa on top. It contains (seven times the vitamin C of oranges); (four times the vitamin A of carrots), (four times the calcium of milk), (three times the potassium of banana) and (two times the protein of yogurt).But the micro-nutrient content is even more in dried leaves; (ten times the vitamin A of carrots), (17 times the calcium of milk), (15 times the potassium of bananas), (25 times the iron of spinach) and (nine times the protein of yogurt). (Vitamin C drops to half that of oranges).Other micro-nutrients found in the Moringa leaves are thiamin, riboflavin, nicotine acid, chromium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium and zinc.“Moringa is a very simple and readily available solution to the problem of malnutrition,” says researcher Lowell Fuglie in a dossier, Natural Nutrition for the Tropics.A case study was conducted between 1997 and 1998 in south-western Senegal by the Alternative Action for African Development (AGADA) and Church World Service (CWS) on the ability of Moringa leaf powder to prevent and cure malnutrition in pregnant women and/or breastfeeding mothers and their children.The results were stunningly overwhelming!• Children increased their weight and improved overall healthPregnant women recovered from anemia and had babies with higher birth weights• Breastfeeding women increased their production of milkIn Zambia, an independent study among rural women and children has been carried out at MpulabushiFarm, 65 kilometres southeast of Ndola. The malnourished children around the area have shownbrightness, good health and increased weight after month-long dosages of Moringa leaf powder inporridge. Women have had high production of milk and shown vigorous activity in home chores and
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