Component also involves the need to know what topics

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component also involves the need to know what topics are appropriate and which topics should be avoided. Task Role Behavior Each one of us performs tasks on a daily basis—at work, at school, etc. With intercultural communication; however, these tasks are not defined the same over cultural boundaries. One culture may define a specific activity as a work task, and other may define the same tasks as a work activity. For instance, many cultures expect a “getting acquainted” phase at a bar or restaurant as imperative prior to doing business. This is considered to be part of the work task, yet many U.S. Americans view having dinner or drinks even with a potential client, as socializing. Relational Role Behavior Relational role behaviors relate to the way a person builds or maintains relationships. What is the appropriate behavior for a friend, a colleague, an acquaintance? The answers to these questions vary depending on the culture. For example, many U.S. Americans value straightforwardness and expect a friend to tell you openly their opinion when asked. Other cultures, however, are less direct. Tolerance for Ambiguity Tolerance for ambiguity concerns a person’s response to new and unpredictable situations. Some people react to new situations with greater ease than do others who may be anxious, rude, withdrawn or even confrontational. Competent intercultural communicators are able to cope with the nervousness and frustrations that accompany new situations, thereby adapting to the need for change. Interaction Posture “Interaction posture refers to the ability to respond to others in a way that is descriptive, nonevaluative, and nonjudgmental. Although the specific verbal and nonverbal messages that express judgments and evaluations can vary from
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culture to culture, the importance of selecting messages that do not convey evaluative judgments is paramount. Statements based on clear judgments of rights and wrongs indicate a closed or predetermined framework of attitudes, beliefs, and values and they are used by the evaluative, and less competent, intercultural communicator. Nonevaluative and nonjudgmental actions are characterized by verbal and nonverbal messages based on descriptions rather than on interpretations or evaluations.”15 BASIC Dimensions of Intercultural Competence Display of Respect: The ability to show respect and positive regard for another person. Orientation of Knowledge: The terms people use to explain themselves and the world around them. Empathy: The capacities to behave as though you understand the world as others do. Interaction Management: Skill in regulating conversations. Task Role Behavior: Behaviors that involve the initiation of ideas related to group problem- solving activities.
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