Release the air from your balloon and note the effort required to blow up your

Release the air from your balloon and note the effort

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Release the air from your balloon, and note the effort required to blow up your balloon. Now, place a few drops of tap water into your balloon and rub the sides of the balloon together so there is no air in the balloon. Now, attempt to blow up your balloon again. (2pts) Briefly (2 sentences) describe differences you noted in the two attempts to blow up your balloon. Blowing up the balloon on the first attempt took a lot of initial effort (when completely dry) and was overall slightly difficult but blowing up the damp balloon (second attempt) was much easier. The first attempt required much deeper, stronger breaths, while the second attempt was slightly more effortless (didn’t require as deep and strong of breaths). The liquid in the second balloon attempt is mimicking surfactant (water droplets) within the alveoli (balloon) and is thus making it easier to inflate the balloon (alveoli) to allow air to reach the respiratory membrane. This demonstration illustrates the strength of surface tension of liquids. In the alveoli of the lungs there are cells that produce surfactant, which acts to decrease surface tension of liquid within the alveoli. This makes it easier to inflate the alveoli to allow air to reach the respiratory membrane. Premature newborns may not produce enough surfactant and may need administration of synthetic surfactant. If alveoli collapse due to pathology or injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome is the result.
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