Sue thread dempsey question 24 constraints and

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Successful Project Management
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Chapter 1 / Exercise 6
Successful Project Management
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SueThread:Dempsey ­ Question 24 ­ Constraints andBottlenecksPost:Dempsey ­ Question 24 ­ Constraints andBottlenecksAuthor:Posted Date:January 16, 2016 9:04 AMStatus:PublishedQ 24. – Using the definitions from the text, describe and illustrate thesimilarities and differences between a constraint and a bottleneck.Per the text, a constraint is any factor that limits the performance of a systemand restricts output. A bottleneck is a special type of constraint that relates tothe capacity shortage of a process.I really struggled with trying to tell the difference between these 2 definitions.They can be used interchangeably in many situations. The way I see it, aconstraint is a process/workstation or some other unit of work that limits thetotal amount of output that can be generated. For example if a golf ball companyhas only 1 machine that can string a ball, and it can only string 100 ball per day(I know bad example) then there is no way the company can ever produce morethan 100 balls per day period... thus this is a constraint. They have other tasksto do with the golf ball after it completes the stringing, like wrapping, stampingthe logo and packaging, but they can only produce as many as the machine canstring, so they are limited by that constraint.In this example, the stringing is also a bottleneck because there is idle time forthe other tasks which are waiting for the golf balls to move to the next workstation… in this case the wrapping station. If they were able to increase thecapacity output of the number of strung golf balls, either by adding a machine orby using a 3rdparty to provide a strung but unwrapped ball, they could thenreduce the idle time in the subsequent workstations and increase the totaloutput of golf balls. (This example got worse the more I worked on it).Also, in this case, the constraint is the machine running 24 hours per day andWilliam Dempsey
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2/21/2016Collection – MBA675­T303 Operations & Logistics in the (...10/32(Post is Read)only outputting 100 golf balls. If this were a company and only had a single 6hour shift, then the bottleneck would be that the machine could only produce 25balls (100 / 4 = 25) per shift. This bottleneck could be improved by addingadditional shifts but would be restricted to a maximum of 4 shifts (6 x 4 = 24).I should have used something other than golf balls, but the difference can beapplied to most any other product being produced.Thread:Dempsey ­ Question 24 ­ Constraints andBottlenecksPost:RE: Dempsey ­ Question 24 ­ Constraints andBottlenecksAuthor:Posted Date:January 16, 2016 1:17 PMStatus:PublishedBill,Your golf ball example isn’t as bad as you think, so I’ll add in some morecomments to your discussion to help clarify. The difference in my mind is thebig picture versus a small part of the picture.

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