commands good and forbids evil and to locate it in the realm of morality Thus

Commands good and forbids evil and to locate it in

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commands good and forbids evil, and to locate it in the realm of morality. Thus, attitudes opposed to the will of God and love of neighbor such as excessive desire for profit, the thirst for power, selfish economic decisions, etc., become ‘moral evils’ whose theological recognition calls for conversion. The theme of conversion echoes his call in Centesimus Annus for moral renovation as the first and most important task for societal transformation. He argued that the elimination of unjust structures alone cannot change the internal dispositions and attitudes of the human person. Thus, the pope insists that the place to begin is the human heart, where the individual embraces an active commitment to her/his neighbor as one human family. As a manifestation of the oneness of the human family, the pope points to the ‘positive moral
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value of the growing awareness of the interdependence among individuals and nations’. Having placed interdependence in the moral category, John Paul is able to posit that the correlative response as a moral social attitude, as a ‘virtue’ is solidarity. According to Donal Dorr, John Paul II’s account of solidarity in Sollicitudo rei socialis is part of the Pope’s effort to overcome the individualistic viewpoint on virtue and the moral life, which marred moral theology in the past. By emphasizing solidarity as a virtue, the Pope wants to say that virtue is not a private affair. Just as personal sin always has social dimension, virtue, especially solidarity has effect on other people and the social order. However, to appreciate further how solidarity functions as a virtue a very brief overview of the concept of virtue is necessary. Virtue: Etymologically, the word virtue derives from the Latin vir, meaning man, hero, man of courage. From this standpoint virtue signifies manliness or courage. According to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, ‘a virtue is an habitual and firm disposition to do the good. It allows the person not only to perform good acts, but to give the best of himself. The virtuous person’.pursues the good and choses it in concrete actions’. The Catechism also divides virtues into human and theological. While the human virtues are ‘firm attitudes, stable dispositions, habitual perfections of the intellect’, comprising the cardinal virtues of prudence, justice, temperance and fortitude; the theological virtues are ‘infused by God into the souls of the faithful’, comprising faith, hope, and charity. By connecting solidarity to justice and charity in Sollicitudo rei socialis, John Paul II, inserts solidarity as both a human and a theological virtue. Solidarity as a human virtue: The virtue of solidarity, assets John Paul II, is not ‘a feeling of vague compassion or shallow distress at the misfortune of so many people both near and far. On the contrary, it is a firm and persevering determination to commit oneself to the common good; that is to say to the good of all’. By positively defining solidarity as ‘a firm and persevering determination’ the pope affirms that it is a
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