4 orisons prayers here funeral prayers 5 mockeries

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4 orisons - prayers, here funeral prayers 5 mockeries - ceremonies which are insults. Here Owen seems to be suggesting that the Christian religion, with its loving God, can have nothing to do with the deaths of so many thousands of men 6 demented - raving mad 7 bugles - a bugle is played at military funerals (sounding the last post) 8 shires - English counties and countryside from which so many of the soldiers came 9 candles - church candles, or the candles lit in the room where a body lies in a coffin 10 pallor - paleness 11 dusk has a symbolic significance here 12 drawing-down of blinds - normally a preparation for night, but also, here, the tradition of drawing the blinds in a room where a dead person lies, as a sign to the world and as a mark of respect. The coming of night is like the drawing down of blinds. Notes copyright © David Roberts and Saxon Books 1998 and 19991.How does Owen answer the questions that open his two stanzas?2.What weapons of war does the poet name in the first eight lines? How are these weapons juxtaposed with elements associated with a funeral service?3.What do you think is the effect of the poem's final line?4.How does this poem relate to All Quiet on the Western Front?

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