CHARACTERS IN CANDIDE Describe each of the following characters and explain

Characters in candide describe each of the following

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CHARACTERS IN CANDIDE-Describe each of the following charactersand explain his/her significance in the novella. Candide-from the French for “pure, innocent, naive”. This story is an adventureand a romance. Some readers have seen it as the story of a young man’s education, of hisjourney from naivete to maturity. He begins as a gullible, simple soul, with a naive faith in histeacher Pangloss. This faith allows him to believe that all is for the best in the world. Candide’s eyes are opened, he loses his belief in optimism. For a time, he has nothing toreplace his former optimism, but in the final chapter he finds a new belief — in work as a meansto contentment. Candide’s character evolves in various ways. He becomes more realistic andless idealistic. Always a questioner, he comes in time to modify his reactions to the answers he’sgiven, in accordance with his newly gained experiences. At the beginning of the tale, forexample, he accepts the optimist’s justification for the evils he encounters. But as his journeycontinues, he questions how anything seen universally as evil can be for the best. Candide is amore independent man at the end of the story than he is at the beginning. Not everything aboutCandide changes. Despite his excessive optimism as the story opens, he is portrayed as alsohave positive characteristics: “an honest mind and great simplicity of heart.” He is loyal to hisfriends and to Cunegonde. He remains a kind man, generous, and honest in his dealings withothers. Some of his negative characteristics do not leave him completely, either. Although he isless naive as he settles in Constantinople, he is still gullible enough to be swindled out of the lastof his money in the final chapter. Pangloss-the character that changes the least. He is the optimist philosopher whoremains the optimist philosopher, even after he is hanged, sent to the galley as a prisoner, andcaused to lose an eye and an ear. He is a foil for Candide. Although Pangloss is physicallyabsent for much of the story, he is always present in spirit. Pangloss may stand for more thanjust philosophical optimism — he may stand for philosophy itself, for any attempt to reduce theworld to a single system of belief. True to his name which in Greek means “all tongue,”Pangloss’s main role is to state and restate his belief in optimism, despite all the evidence to thecontrary. He is a deliberately ludicrous figure, since Voltaire is trying to expose the absurdityof the beliefs he stands for. Cunegonde-Like Pangloss, Cunegonde is often physically absent in Candide. Alsolike Pangloss, Cunegonde is nearly always present in spirit. Candide’s journey is a journey tofind Cunegonde and make her his bride. She is the beloved, the lovely Cunegonde whom hestruggles so long to find. As his optimist philosophy crashes about him, Cunegonde is his ray ofhope. The final irony for Candide is that when he does find Cunegonde she is no longer thelovely young girl he remembered. She has grown ugly, and, after their marriage, she turns intoa shrew. As
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